Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Menu Search Arrow Right Arrow Left Arrow Down Arrow Up Home Arrow Next Arrow Previous RSS Icon Calendar Icon Warning Icon
Know someone that's had an impact on our industry? Nominate them for the EASA Award. SUBMIT NOMINATION

Filter the results

  • Enter one or more words to find resources containing any of the words entered
  • Enter words or phrases between " " to find exact match

Resource categories

Resource Library

How to deal with wet or flooded motors

Saltwater becomes a major problem

  • October 2019
  • Number of views: 139
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

Flooding in the aftermath of tropical storms, including hurricanes, monsoons and cyclones, and with their associated heavy rainfall can shut down hundreds of plants along the Gulf Coast, from Florida to Texas, as well as in other places around the world. And they are doing so more often. To get them up and running again, maintenance departments and motor repairers face the daunting task of cleaning muck and moisture from many thousands of electric motors and generators. The process involved in such situations can take weeks, if not months, and requires special clean-up procedures for motors contaminated by saltwater.

What’s in a nameplate?

Information helps the selection of the right motor regardless of application

  • November 2018
  • Number of views: 128
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

Whether you're selecting a motor for a new application or a replacement for one that has failed, you need a reliable way to match the capabilities and performance characteristics of various motors with the requirements of the application.

Motor maintenance trends: 6 factors to evaluate

Recent EASA research studies provide new insights on repair vs. replace to help motors reliably drive machinery, pumps, conveyors, and other vital industrial equipment

  • June 2018
  • Number of views: 116
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

When faced with an ailing or failed motor, plant operators typically consider whether to repair or replace it. According to a 2014 study conducted by Plant Engineering magazine for the Electrical Apparatus and Service Association (EASA), just more than one-half of plants have a policy of automatically replacing failed electric motors below a certain horsepower rating. While that horsepower rating varied depending upon the plant’s installed motor population, the average rating was 30 hp.

While such policies address a portion of the motors used at most plants, they do not cover what occurs with those motors. That question was addressed in a more recent research project commissioned by EASA that focused on the disposition of electric motors considered for repair.

Considerations for using VFDs with standard motors

  • December 2016
  • Number of views: 110
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

There are a few areas of concern involving the misapplication variable frequency drives (VFDs) on a standard induction motor. This article looks at some of those.

How to properly operate a three-phase motor using single-phase power

  • October 2016
  • Number of views: 164
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

There are several methods to operating a three-phase motor using single-phase power to make what would be an otherwise expensive and arduous process a little easier.

Sleeve bearing clearance depends on many factors

  • June 2016
  • Number of views: 90
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

“What’s the proper clearance between a shaft and the sleeve bearing it rides in?” Chances are each of us has a rule of thumb for this, probably related to shaft diameter.

Mechanical repairs play a key role in motor repair and reliability

EASA AR100 details steps to take to clean, repair, and test equipment

  • November 2015
  • Number of views: 78
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

In a previous article in Plant Engineering ("A systematic approach to AC motor repair," Plant Engineering, April 2015), EASA highlighted the good practices for electrical repair found in ANSI/EASA Standard AR100 Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus, and the significant impact they can have on motor efficiency and reliability. But that was only part of the story, because mechanical repairs—and even documentation, cleaning, and inspection—can also markedly affect motor reliability and efficiency.

The quest to find the ‘perfect’ bearing fit

Measuring is critical to the reliability of rotating equipment

  • October 2015
  • Number of views: 49
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

Much has been said and done to produce the "perfect" fit for rolling element bearings in motors and other rotating equipment. Assembly of these machines requires that either the inner fit to the shaft (journal) or the outer fit to the housing (bore) is able to slide; so if one fit is tight, the other must be loose. While "tight" and "loose" are relative terms that must be defined in the quest for the perfect fit, any fit that's too loose or too tight can lead to early bearing failure and costly downtime.

Keeping it simple: Steps to determine motor’s actual load

Oversized motors cost more to operate—sometimes a lot more. Fortunately, there’s a simple procedure for determining the actual hp required by a load, without expensive equipment or engineering

  • October 2014
  • Number of views: 72
  • Article rating: No rating
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

Contrary to popular opinion, bigger isn’t always better—especially when it comes to electric motors. Plant maintenance and engineering departments like having a little extra power available “just in case,” so they sometimes specify larger motors than applications require. But oversized motors cost more to operate—sometimes a lot more.

Getting The Most From Your Electric Motors

Getting The Most From Your Electric Motors - coverThis 40-page booklet provides a great marketing tool for your service center! Use it to provide end users with information that will help them obtain the longest, most efficient and cost-effective operation from general and definite purpose electric motors.

This booklet covers topics such as:

  • Installation, startup and baseline information
  • Operational monitoring and maintenance
  • Motor and baseline installation data
  • How to read a motor nameplate
  • Motor storage recommendations

LEARN MORE AND DOWNLOAD MÁS INFORMACIÓN Y DESCARGAR

READ MORE ABOUT THE FEATURES AND BENEFITS

EASA Technical Manual

EASA Technical Manual cover

The EASA Technical Manual is the association's definitive and most complete publication. It's available FREE to members in an online format. Members can also download PDFs of the entire manual or individual sections.

VIEW & DOWNLOAD

ANSI/EASA AR100-2015

ANSI/EASA AR100-2015 cover

Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus
This is a must-have guide to the repair of rotating electrical machines. Its purpose is to establish recommended practices in each step of the rotating electrical apparatus rewinding and rebuilding processes.

DOWNLOAD - ENGLISH

DESCARGAR - ESPAÑOL

EASA AR200

EASA AR200: Guide for the Repair of Power and Distribution Transformers cover

Guide for the Repair of Power and Distribution Transformers
This document establishes guidelines for each step of the repair of power transformers, describing record keeping, tests, analysis, and general guidelines for the repair of power transformers.

LEARN MORE