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How to schedule

To schedule private education for your group, contact:

Dale Shuter, CMP
Meetings & Expositions Manager

+1 314 993 2220, ext. 3335
dshuter@easa.com

1 hour of training

$300 for EASA Chapters/Regions
$400 for member companies
$800 for non-members

How a webinar works

All EASA private webinars are live events in which the audio and video are streamed to your computer over the Internet. Prior to the program, you will receive a web link to join the meeting. 

The presentation portion of the webinar will last about 45 minutes, followed by about 15 minutes of questions and answers.

Requirements

  • Internet connection
  • Computer with audio input (microphone) and audio output (speakers) appropriate for your size group
  • TV or projector/screen

Zoom logo

The Zoom webinar service EASA uses will ask to install a small plugin. Your computer must be configured to allow this in order to have full functionality. Please check with your IT department or company's security policy prior to scheduling a private webinar.

Private webinars

EASA's private webinars are an inexpensive way to bring an EASA engineer into your service center, place of business or group meeting without incurring travel expenses or lost production time.

A closer look: Winding protection device can prevent permanent damage to motor

A closer look: Winding protection device can prevent permanent damage to motor

Cyndi Nyberg
Former EASA Technical Support Specialist 

There are a number of different types of wind­ing protection devices used with motors. However, they all basically do the same thing; they sense a change from the normal operating temperature and either sound an alarm or take the motor off line when the specified temperature limit has been met or exceeded. 

Temperature protection is not limited to just large motors. A smaller motor that is critical to op­eration would be a good candidate for winding temperature protection if a failure would cause significant costs due to downtime. 

AC Electric Motor Design

AC Electric Motor Design

6
presentations
$30
for EASA members

 

A special discounted collection of 6 webinar recordings focusing on AC electric motor design.

Once purchased, all 6 recordings will be available on your "Downloadable products purchased" page in your online account.

Downloadable recordings in this bundle include:

The Basics: AC Motor Design
Presented July 2016

This webinar recording covers: 

  • Various types of AC motors and bases for operation
  • Squirrel cage induction motor rotor design / construction
  • Squirrel cage induction motor stator design / construction

How Winding Changes Affect Motor Performance
Presented January 2019

This webinar recording focuses on the effect of three-phase stator winding changes on efficiency and reliability.

Specific changes addressed will include:

  • Connection
  • Circuits
  • Turns
  • Span/pitch
  • Grouping sequence
  • Concentric to lap, and vice versa
  • Wire area per turn and per slot

Target audience: Service center technicians and supervisors.


Motor Starting Capabilities and Considerations
Presented March 2014

This webinar addresses the topic of a three phase squirrel cage motor’s ability to successfully accelerate a driven load. Although a motor can drive a running load, that is not assurance that it has the capability to accelerate the load up to rated speed. The difference between success and failure is determined by some complex conditions. For example, the motor torque during starting is not constant, and unless the load is a pure inertia load (very rare), it does not have a constant speed-torque relationship. Key considerations addressed include acceleration time, acceleration torque, motor heating, stator and rotor limits, and torque variables.

Target audience: This presentation will be most useful for service center sales personnel, engineers, supervisors and managers. The content will be beneficial for moderate through highly experienced persons.


AC Motor Redesign: Speed Changes
Presented January 2015

This presentation focuses on AC motor redesigns involving speed changes. Service centers encounter scenarios such as the procurement of a single-speed motor that must be redesigned for two speeds or redesign of an existing two-speed motor for use on an adjustable-speed drive.

Topics covered include:

  • Single-speed, one-winding to two-speed, one-winding
  • Single-speed, one-winding to two-speed, two-winding
  • Two-speed, two-winding to single-speed, one-winding
  • Two-speed, one-winding to single-speed, one-winding

The redesign examples are performed using EASA’s AC Motor Verification & Redesign program, including use of the integrated motor winding database for locating comparative data. Examples will include other changes such as voltage, frequency and horsepower.


Magnetic Wedges
Presented January 2019

An increasing number of manufacturers are using magnetic wedges in their form-wound machines. When a winder fails to replace magnetic wedges in kind, the winding temperature rise can increase by 20°C, and the magnetizing current can increase by 20% or more.

This recording explains why they are used, provides a balanced review of the benefits and negative issues associated with their use, and explains how to avoid the problems.

  • Why some manufacturers use magnetic wedges
  • Benefits of magnetic wedges
  • Downside of magnetic wedges
  • Fitting and installation to prevent them from falling out in service

Target audience: This will benefit service center technicians and supervisors.


Speed/Torque Curves
Presented March 2017

This recording covers:

  • Starting torque
  • Breakdown torque
  • Full load torque
  • Speed current curve
  • Load torque curve
  • Impact of reduced voltage start (autotransformer, PWS, wye-delta)
  • Slot combination problems (noise, torque cusp, cogging)

It is very important to understand speed/torque curves and how they impact motor operation.

Target audience: Engineers, mechanics, winders and sales persons with fundamental knowledge of motor operation. 

AC Motor Electrical Procedures

AC Motor Electrical Procedures

11
presentations
$55
for EASA members

 

A special discounted collection of 11 webinar recordings focusing on AC motor electrical procedures.

Once purchased, all 11 recordings will be available on your "Downloadable products purchased" page in your online account.

Downloadable recordings in this bundle include:

The Basics: Motor Repair Burnout Procedures
Presented October 2016

  • Interlaminar insulation materials / properties of AC stators
  • Core testing before and after
  • Processing equipment, controls and records

The Basics: The Why and How of Core Testing
Presented October 2016

  • The reasons for performing core testing and why they are important
  • An explanation of the two core testing methods:
  • Loop testing
  • Use of a core tester
  • How to properly perform a core test
  • How to assess the results
  • Stator Core Testing: Know What You Have Before You Wind It

Stator Core Testing: Know What You Have Before You Wind It
Presented April 2017

This presentation covers:

  • The importance of the stator core test 
  • Simple theory to share with technicians and customers 
  • Practical approach for testing small stators demonstrated 
  • Eliminating pen + paper; loop test calculations for any device 
  • Assessing the results

High Potential Testing of AC Windings
Presented December 2019

High-potential testing is routinely used to assess the ground insulation of AC stator windings in-process, after completion of a rewind and post-delivery. This webinar covers:

  • Differences between AC and DC high-potential tests
  • Sizing AC test sets when testing large windings
  • What relevant standards address (and what they don’t)
  • Communicating test requirements to all stakeholders
  • When to test and at what levels
  • How to evaluate results

Target audience: Beneficial for service center managers, supervisors and technicians responsible for high-potential testing.


Squirrel Cage Rotor Testing
Presented October 2014

Determining whether or not a squirrel cage rotor is defective is an issue that is a challenge to every service center as there is often no simple way to determine the integrity of a rotor. The primary focus of this session is to describe many of the available tests that can be utilized in the service center or at the motor installation site. In addition to conventional squirrel cage rotor testing methods such as the growler test, techniques that will also be covered are the use of a core loss tester, high current excitation, and spectrum analysis of vibration.

Target audience: This presentation will be most useful for service center and field technicians with at least 2 years experience, service center supervisors and managers, engineers, or anyone with previous experience dealing with suspected open rotor issues.


Evaluating High No-Load Amps of Three-Phase Motors
Presented December 2011

This presentation focuses on the steps to take before rewinding to avoid the undesirable situation of high no-load motor amps after the rewind.

The presentation covers the following steps that should be performed on every AC stator rewind:

  • Inspect the stator bore and rotor outside diameter for evidence of machining or damage
  • Record the original winding data exactly as found
  • Verify the winding data
  • Test the stator core before and after rewinding removal

Target audience: This is most useful for service center mechanics and winders with any level of experience, and service center supervisors and managers.


Insulation Technology Improvements and the Repair Market
Presented July 2019

Most modern rotating electric machines operate on the same principles their predecessors have for 100+ years. However, improvements in materials technology over that time have allowed for increasingly greater power density in machine design.

There is a natural time lag between OEM technology improvement and repair of equipment containing that technology. This session will explore some of these improvements and their implications for service centers attempting to provide a quality repair.

Target audience: This webinar will be appropriate for service center managers and technicians responsible for rewind activities.


Motor Temperature Rise and Methods to Increase Winding Life
Presented December 2018

This webinar discusses:

  • Temperature rise: Method of detection, Insulation class, Enclosure, and Service Factor
  • Increasing winding life: Insulation class, Cooling system, and Winding redesign

Target audience: This will be most useful for service center engineers, supervisors, managers and owners. The content will also be beneficial for mechanics and winders.


Air Gap: What It Is, What Does It Do, and Why Is It Important?
Presented October 2019

The physical air gap between the rotor or armature and the stator or field frame is complex and plays a critical role in the performance of AC and DC machines. Most repairers do not realize how little they understand about this subject.

This webinar explains the role air gap plays in AC motor performance, how to recognize the symptoms of an uneven air gap, and share corrective measures. For DC machines, this webinar will cover the distinctly different role of the field air gap as opposed to the air gap of the interpoles.

  • Air gap tolerance of AC machines
  • Air gap tolerance of DC fields and interpoles
  • Allowable runout of rotor / armature
  • Recognizing the signs of air gap anomalies
  • Corrective actions

Target audience: This webinar recording is of benefit to managers, supervisors, winders, mechanics and field service personnel.


Troubleshooting AC Generators & Alternators
Presented May 2015

This recording covers theory of operation, inspection, operation and troubleshooting tips for AC generators and alternators. For the supervisor, field service technician or service center personnel, generators can present unique challenges. Topics covered include:

  • Theory of operation
  • Testing tips
  • Stator winding cautions
  • How to interpret the exciter motor connection
  • In-shop and on-site testing methods
  • How to test the voltage regulator
  • How to test a generator without a regulator

Core Repair and Restack Techniques
Presented April 2014

This webinar teaches:

  • How to repair damaged stator cores and how to know when a restack is necessary.
  • There are often cases when repairs can be accomplished without a labor intensive restack.
  • When a restack is required, there are pitfalls to watch out for to avoid problems with geometry, vibration and core losses.

Target audience: This presentation is useful to the supervisor, winder and sales personnel who interact with the end user.

Ajuste de Los Cojinetes de Deslizamiento

Ajuste de Los Cojinetes de Deslizamiento

Chuck Yung
Especialista Sénior de Soporte Técnico de EASA

Cuando se rebabitan o se reemplazan cojinetes de deslizamiento, un paso importante durante el montaje consiste en verificar el contacto entre el cojinete y el muñón del eje que monta sobre el. El uso de cojinetes de deslizamiento auto alineables (también denominados esféricos o de ajuste esférico) hace que este paso sea casi innecesario. Aun así, los cojinetes de deslizamiento cilíndricos se deben inspeccionar para verificar que haya suficiente área de contacto.

Los cojinetes de deslizamiento, también conocidos como cojinetes de babbitt, de metal blanco o cojinetes lisos, han sido utilizados por más de 150 años. Para una explicación detallada sobre el diseño y funcionamiento de los cojinetes de deslizamiento solicite a EASA el documento de la convención del 2007: “Sleeve Bearing Repair Tips,” o el libro Mechanical Repair Fundamentals of Electric Motors, 2nd Edition.

Este es un artículo específico para verificar y corregir el patrón de desgaste al momento de instalar cojinetes nuevos en un motor eléctrico. Ajustar cojinetes no es difícil, solo se requiere algún conocimiento básico, Un parte interesante de la historia es el kit de herramientas suministrado con el antiguo automóvil Ford -Modelo A, que incluía un cuchillo para babbitt para rascar los cojinetes del cigüeñal. Imagine desmontar el motor de su auto en el camino, para retirar y ajustar los cojinetes de babbitt.

An overview of financial performance in distribution

An overview of financial performance in distribution

Dr. Al Bates, President
The Profit Planning Group
Boulder, Colorado

The accompanying set of exhibits provides an overview of financial trends in distribution between 2005 and 2009. It places special emphasis on the changes between 2008 and 2009. The information related to EASA comes from data provided by partici­pants in the Operating Performance Survey.  

The analysis covers 34 different lines of trade in distribution. In devel­oping such a macro-view of distribu­tion, it is not possible to compare most financial ratios directly. For example, some industries have a high gross mar­gin and accompanying high expenses, while others have a low gross margin and low expenses.

ANSI/EASA Standard AR100-2020: Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus

ANSI/EASA Standard AR100-2020: Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus

ANSI/EASA AR100-2020EASA’s “Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus” is designated ANSI/EASA AR100 and was first approved as an American National standard in 1998. Since then it has been revised and approved four more times, in 2001, 2006, 2010, 2015 and now in 2020. 

ANSI/EASA AR100 is a must-have guide to the repair of rotating electrical machines. Its purpose is to establish recommended practices in each step of the rotating electrical apparatus rewinding and rebuilding processes.

The scope of this document describes record keeping, tests, analysis and general guidelines for the repair of induction, synchronous and direct current rotating electrical apparatus. It is not intended to take the place of the customer's or the machine manufacturer's specific instructions or specifications or specific accepted and applicable industry standards or recommended practices.

This document should be supplemented by additional requirements applicable to specialized rotating electrical apparatus including, but not limited to, listed explosion-proof, dust-ignition proof, and other listed machines for hazardous locations; and specific or additional requirements for hermetic motors, hydrogen-cooled machines, submersible motors, traction motors, or Class 1E nuclear service motors.

ANSI recognizes only one standard on a topic; therefore, ANSI/EASA AR100 is the American standard for repair of rotating electrical apparatus.The Recommended Practice is an important publication to distribute both internally and to customers.

Download or Purchase
This document is available as a FREE download (see links below) or printed copies may be purchased from EASA's online store in the near future.

DOWNLOAD AR100-2020 BUY PRINTED COPIES

Approval Process
The EASA Technical Services Committee (TSC) reviews the recommended practice and proposes changes; a canvass group approves and often comments on the TSC proposals. The canvass group has representation from service centers, end users, testing laboratories, government and those with a general interest. Per ANSI requirements, there must be balanced representation among the canvass group representatives. After the canvass group and the TSC find consensus agreement, the revised document is approved by the EASA Board of Directors. Following Board approval, ANSI is requested to approve the revision as an American National Standard. The entire process must be completed within five years following the previous revision. 

What’s New in 2020?
The 2020 edition of AR100 contains more than 40 revisions. Here, we will focus on the more significant changes, noted in clause order, and some of the reasons for making these changes. Also noted will be links between the changes and the EASA Accreditation Program. 

1.6 Terminal Leads: Added a note, “If the machine has a service factor, the terminal leads should be rated for the service factor current.” This is the practice used by many motor manufacturers. For example, if a motor had a full load current rating of 100 amps and a service factor of 1.15, the approximate service factor current would be 115 amps, and the lead wire size would be based on the 115 amp value. 

1.9 Cooling System: Added a new sentence: “The locations of air baffles and any stator end winding spacers that are utilized for guiding airflow should be documented prior to any stator winding removal to allow duplication within a replacement winding.” This applies to stator rewinds and helps ensure that the cooling airflow is not reduced during the rewind process. Effective August 2021, this will be a requirement in the Accreditation Program Checklist item 3. Cooling System.

2.5.1 Rotating Elements: The sentence, “The outer diameter of the rotating element laminations should be true and concentric with the bearing journals,” has been replaced with, “The runout of the rotating element core outside diameter relative to the bearing journals should not exceed 5 percent of the average radial air gap, or 0.003” (0.08 mm), whichever is the smaller value.” The new text is independent of the number of poles in a machine and is in line with tolerances used by motor manufacturers. 

3.1.2 Thermal Protectors or Sensors: The former clause 3.9 has been added for clarity. It states, “Replacement thermostats, resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), thermocouples and thermistors should be identical with or equivalent to the originaldevices in electrical and thermal characteristics and placed at the same locations in the winding. Thermal protectors or sensors should be removed or omitted only with customer consent and documented in the repair record.” The reason for moving the text of 3.9 into 3.12 was to have the topic of thermal protectors and sensors addressed in one clause. Since 3.9 was deleted, the remaining clauses of Section 3 beginning with former clause 3.10 were renumbered. 

  Table 4-2 Recommended Minimum Insulation Resistance Values at 40°C: This table and Table 4-1 were unnumbered in previous editions of AR100, including the 2015 edition. For clarity and editorial consistency, these two tables are now numbered. The tables that were, and remain, at the end of Section 4 were renumbered. A substantive technical change was that the minimum insulation resistance for all armatures is now IR1min = 5, which aligns with the 2013 edition of IEEE 43. 

4.2.4 Form-Wound Stator Surge Tests and 4.2.5 All Other Windings Surge Tests: Two identical paragraphs have been added to each of these clauses. The first paragraph explains how a surge pattern distinguishes between a satisfactory and unsatisfactory test result. The second paragraph explains that surge test results can be influenced by multiple factors, and that analysis of surge test results is subjective.  

Table 4-3 Form Coil New Winding Surge Test Voltages: This is a new table that provides surge test voltage levels for machines rated from 400 to 13800 volts in accordance with IEEE 522 and IEC 60034-15. The notes below the table provide test levels for uncured resin-rich or dry (green) VPI coils, and maintenance test levels for reconditioned windings.

 4.3.1 Stator and Wound-Rotor Windings: Two notes have been added to this clause. They are: “Per CSA C392 the resistance unbalance limit for random windings should be 2% from the average, and 1% from the average for form coil windings,” and, “Some concentric windings may exceed the 2% limit.” These notes add resistance balance tolerances and provide guidance for assessing resistive unbalance with concentric windings. 

4.4.1.1 New Windings: The sentence, “Immediately after rewind, when equipment is installed or assembled and a high-potential test of the entire assembly is required, it is recommended that the test voltage not exceed 80% of the original test voltage,” has been replaced with, “Immediately after rewind, when a high-potential test of the winding is required, it is recommended that the test voltage not exceed 80% of the original test voltage.” The primary reason for the change is that AR100 is a repair document, not an installation guide or standard. 

Conclusion 
The work of the Technical Services Committee to revise and improve AR100 is a continual process. Within a year or two, the revision process will become an active agenda item for the TSC. One of the foremost goals with AR100 is to include as many good practices as possible. Further, when it is desired or necessary to add new good practices to the Accreditation Program, AR100 is the conduit. The reason for this approach is that AR100 is the primary source document for the EASA Accreditation Program. 

Since AR100 is revised periodically it is a “living document.” Changes to AR100 not only aid with the Accreditation Program, its good practices and other guidance help enable service centers to provide quality repairs that maintain or sometimes even improve rotating electrical apparatus reliability and energy efficiency.

Documents to download

Applying the best of repair best practices: Rewind study continues to pay off with important tips

Applying the best of repair best practices: Rewind study continues to pay off with important tips

Tom Bishop, P.E. 
EASA Technical Support Specialist

There are certain repair processes that can impact the efficiency and reli­ability of electric motors. Prudent repair practices must not increase overall losses, and preferably should maintain or reduce them. In some cases, repairers can also employ the principles applied by the motor designers and further reduce losses and enhance efficiency. Most of the following material is taken from, or based on, the “The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor Efficiency; EASA/AEMT Rewind Study And Good Practice Guide to Maintain Motor Efficiency.” 

Stator core processing and repair 
Concerns about the possibility of core degradation during the rewind process have been expressed since at least the early 1990s. Higher tempera­ture rated core plate insulation mate­rial greatly reduces the possibility of core degradation during the burnout process. However, a best practice approach is to avoid the possibility of core damage no matter what type of core plate is used. 

The key steps to take during the burnout process are to set the burnout temperature to no more than 680° F (360° C), and use a temperature-sensing device attached to the core being processed to control the oven temperature. Further assurance that degradation will not occur is to use an oven equipped with a water suppression system. If an over-temperature condition is detected, the water spray is immediately activated. This method is highly effective because water changing from a liquid to a gas (steam) absorbs a tremendous amount of heat energy; much more than if simply changing tem­perature by absorbing heat energy. That is, water absorbs as much energy in changing from liquid to steam as it would in theoretically increasing temperature by 540° C (970° F). 

Prior to and following the burnout process the core should be tested, as illustrated in Figure 1. The core can either be loop tested (see Tech Note 17) or tested with a commercial type core tester. Both methods are effective. The watts per unit of weight core loss and temperature rise of the core during the test should be compared to each other (pre-and post-burnout process) and to typical limits. Typical limits for core loss are about 4 watts per pound (9 watts per kg) and for temperature rise about 15° C rise (27° F). Further, the watts loss per unit of weight should not increase more than 20% during the process, and best practice would be for neither temperature nor watts loss to increase at all. 

If the core test or visual inspection reveals core damage, the core should be repaired prior to winding. Minor defects such as splayed or flared laminations should be tamped back in place. A technique that is usually effective for flared laminations is to bend the teeth at the end of the slot at the vertical middle. That is, create a bowed effect, with the center bowed away from the core.

Tamping the teeth (by striking with a slight down­ward angle at the top of the teeth) back to the core causes the bowed teeth to act as a clamping mechanism. 

If lamination material has been eroded but the extent of the damage is minor, the laminations can normally be un-stacked in the affected area and restacked after repositioning the laminations to fill in the area that was missing lamination material. Removal of complete laminations should be avoided. As a guide to determining the limit of “minor” missing core ma­terial, it should not exceed 2% of the length of the core, or not affect more than 10% of the number of teeth. If damage is more extensive than these guidelines, best practice action steps would be to replace the damaged laminations with new laminations, restack the core with all new lamina­tions, replace the core, or replace the entire motor. New laminations can be obtained through firms that specialize in laser cut laminations, using a good original lamination as a template. 

Following core repair, always retest the core before proceeding with the rewind. The watts loss and tem­perature rise should both be less than prior to repair of the core damage; and the watts loss and temperature rise levels should be within the typi­cal limits given above. 

Winding practices 
The best practice goals in winding are to maintain or reduce the winding resistance and to maintain or improve the motor performance characteristics. The winding resistance is maintained by using the same size wire area, and the same mean (average) length of turn. Increasing the wire size area, reducing the mean length of turn, or doing both, reduces winding resis­tance. That reduces the stator winding I2R losses as the winding resistance is the “R” in the I2R equa­tion. Reduced losses mean that efficiency increases and heating is reduced, which length­ens the thermal life of the insulation. 

Reducing the length of the coil extensions is the only method of re­ducing the mean length of turn (MLT – the av­erage length of a single turn of the winding, as depicted in Figure 2) during rewinding. The core length is fixed, thus the only variable is the length of the end turns. The end turn length can be reduced to the point that any further reduction will result in a side force between the coil and the end of the slot. Going beyond that point can result in a winding ground fault due to the coil pulling against the slot cell extension and eventually breaking through it. 

Another consideration with coil extension length is that by reducing it, the surface area exposed to cooling air is also reduced. Although this would rarely be a significant pos­sibility, it should be kept in mind especially when there appears to be an opportunity to significantly reduce the coil extension distance. An example would be the pos­sibility of being able to reduce an approximately 4-inch (100 mm) coil extension to just less than 3-5/8 inches (90 mm). The 10% reduction in exposed length could increase heating due to less heat transfer from coils to cooling air. The effect of a +/- 10% change in MLT for a variety of motor power ratings is illustrated in Table 1. 

Increasing wire area is possible if slot space is available. A benefit of increasing slot fill is that there will be less space between wires, mak­ing varnish penetration and bonding more effective and resulting in better heat transfer as air pockets (voids) are reduced. However, making the wires fit too tightly in the slot can result in damage to the wire insulation as the winding is tamped in place with excessive force; the slot liner can also be damaged. It can also increase the time required to insert the coils. The increased wire area reduces copper (I2R) losses and reduceswinding tem­perature. The effects of these changes are increased efficiency and longer winding thermal life. 

Mechanical repairs 
Replacement bearings should be equivalent to those provided by the motor manufacturer. Selecting an incorrect bearing, such as changing from an open to a sealed bearing, will increase friction losses in the bearing, thus reducing efficiency. Incorrect in­stallation of a bearing—for example, driving it on by pressing against the outer race—can damage the bearing and cause rapid failure. Even a slight amount of damage can result in a noisy bearing. 

Bearings of C-3 internal clearance are the standard for most electric motors. A contact-type sealed bearing can create more friction than a shielded, open or non-contact sealed bear­ing. The increased friction results in a slight drop in efficiency. To avoid degrading efficiency and reducing reliability, it is good practice to remain with the open bearing style installed by the manufacturer. 

Fill the grease reservoir cavity to about one-third to one-half full. Over greasing a bearing, even by a small amount, increases friction losses. This not only reduces ef­ficiency (by 500 watts in one case cited in the EASA/AEMT study); it also causes local overheating, which can seriously reduce bear­ing life. Allow the motor to oper­ate unloaded long enough for the bearing temperature to drop. The drop in temperature indicates that the bearing has expelled excess lubricant and seated itself into a stable position. In essence, this denotes the bearing “break-in” period as shown in Figure 3. 

When application and environment dictate the installation of sealed bearings for reasons of reliability, some increase in bearing temperature and friction losses should be expected. A better alternative is to consider the installation of non-con­tact seals or bearing isolators, which exclude contaminants without causing friction. Some bearing manufacturers also offer non-contact sealed bear­ings. 

Ventilation issues 
Unfortunately, there is little op­portunity to improve efficiency by changing fans or ventilation, except in rare cases where a large increase in wire current capacity is possible, such as when converting from aluminum to copper wire. In such a case the fan size can be reduced if the aluminum wire is replaced with the same size copper wire. Reducing fan size or airflow reduces windage losses at the expense of increased winding heating. The converse also applies; increasing fan size or airflow reduces winding heating at the expense of increased windage losses.

Although we may not have opportunities to reduce losses with ventilation issues, good practices will result in maintaining the original efficiency. 

Installing an incorrect fan, or locating the fan or fan cover in the wrong position (improper clearance between the fan and fan cover), can affect windage. A fan that moves more air, i.e., has higher flow, inher­ently increases windage loss and reduces efficiency. Conversely, a smaller or lower flow fan (see Figure 4) reduces windage but also reduces cooling due to the lower airflow. If a fan has a broken blade or blades, it should be replaced. The miss­ing blade(s) reduce airflow and may increase vibration due to mechanical unbalance. 

Windage varies among fan designs, depending on factors such as diameter, the number and size of blades, mate­rial, and surface finish. The single most important variable is fan diameter. All else being equal, a smaller diameter (D1) trimmed fan moves considerably less air than the larger original diameter (D2), by the ratio: [(D2 / D1)3]; and symmetrical fans of different diameters vary by [(D2 / D1)4]. Thus a propor­tional replacement fan that is 5% larger in diameter compared to the original requires 22% more power to drive the fan. That diverted power is lost power, which reduces motor efficiency. 

An incorrect fan cover may reduce air flow; an example is where the open­ings in it are smaller than the original. Location of the fan relative to the cover is also important. If the fan is too close to the fan cover, cooling air flow will be reduced. A damaged fan cover may result in reduced air flow, as the air may “leak” through the cracks or become turbulent due to a section that has broken off. Even with the correct fan cover, air flow will be reduced if it is not free from dirt or other material that blocks or restricts the vent open­ings. 

Motor design aspects 
Increasing magnetic flux increases core losses and therefore heating of the windings. The results are reduced ef­ficiency and winding life, and reduced reliability. Reducing the number of turns or changing the coil span or connection can increase magnetic flux. Doing the opposite, e.g., increasing turns, reduces magnetic flux. However, the reduced flux reduces torque capa­bility and typically results in higher current for a given load. The higher current means increased I2R losses, reduced efficiency and increased heating. Thus to maintain efficiency and reliability it is best not to change the magnetic flux level of the wind­ing. All else equal, a slight increase in magnetic flux density is preferable to a slight decrease. That’s because a magnetically stronger design has less slip, reducing the rotor losses. 

Repairers of­ten prefer to use lap windings be­cause all coils are the same. This is acceptable provided that the new winding is chosen such that the flux per pole is not changed. Single-layer lap windings are sometimes used motors, because the coils are easier to insert and no separators are required, thus allowing more room for copper. Double layer lap windings give a better flux distribution in the core than single layer windings, and in no circum­stances should a double layer winding be replaced by a single layer wind­ing. To do so will reduce efficiency. 

Conversely, changing from a single- to a double-layer lap winding may reduce losses and improve efficiency slightly. 

If the stator core is partially or fully restacked, a reduction in the total number of laminations reduces the core iron volume, effectively increasing magnetic flux densities. The higher flux levels increase core losses and heating. Improper restacking, such as by not compressing the core tightly enough, or by over-tightening the core, can lead to increased core and stray load losses. A key to a successful restack is to assure that the original core length is maintained and that all of the removed laminations, or equivalent replace­ments, are installed in the core. 

The rotor I2R losses can be in­creased by reducing the end-ring cross-section or by increasing the resistance of the rotor bars and end-rings. The repair process does not normally affect the rotor resistance, unless the rotor is rebarred. If the rotor is rebarred, it is critically important to have the bars and end ring materials tested to determine, and duplicate, the material resistance (or maintain the opposite characteristic, conductivity.) 

If the rotor surface must be cleaned up by machining, a sharp cutting tool is a necessity. The usual reason for need­ing to machine the core is to correct smearing caused by a stator to rotor core rub. Grinding the rotor surface, or machining the rotor core with a blunt tool or at an incorrect surface speed, can result in smearing the laminations together. The smeared laminations probably will not become hot at running speed due to the low rotor frequency of only a few hertz. How­ever, the warmer core area can create a thermal bow, resulting in vibration and an unequal air gap. 

An unequal air gap can cause circulating cur­rents in the stator wind­ing, resulting in increased I2R losses. Repairs to the stator frame or end bracket rabbet/spigot fits that reduce stator-rotor concentricity increase air gap eccentricity, and can result in circulating currents that increase I2R losses. 

An excessive air gap will increase magnetizing current and also increase I2R losses. Machining the rotor diameter to increase air gap can reduce losses at the expense of power factor; however, too great an increase in air gap will increase losses. This should only be done when the manufacturer’s design air gap tolerance is known to the service center. 

Stray load losses, illustrated in Figure 5, are typically 10-20% of total motor loss. Stray loss can increase if the air gap surfaces of the laminations are smeared together. Stray loss will also be increased if the air gap is un­even (i.e., stator and rotor not concen­tric) and may be increased if a wrong replacement rotor is installed. 

Closing comments
Of the things that affect efficiency, a typical repair only influences the core, winding (I2R), and friction losses. These and other key topics have been addressed in these best practices. Documenting the before and after core loss, comparing winding resistance to the manufacturer’s re­cords, and confirming the bearing type provide assurance to you and to the customer that the motor’s efficiency was maintained during the repair.

Asset reduction programs: Chopping versus pruning

Asset reduction programs: Chopping versus pruning

Dr. Al Bates
President, Profit Planning Group
Boulder, Colorado

“So this EASA member walks into a bank and asks for a loan.” Well, there’s no need to wait for the punch line as it is no laughing matter. In many cases, the credit available to members has all but dried up. Where money is available, banking require­ments are becoming more restrictive almost every day. The likelihood of things getting better any time soon is remote.

With enough patience and concert­ed effort, the cash challenge associated with disappearing lines of credit can be overcome by rethinking gross mar­gin and expense levels even during a recession. In fact, this will be the topic of the next Profit Improvement Report.  However, many distributors need cash now, not in six months. The conclusion is that inventory and accounts receiv­able reductions are in order.

Avoid Near-Miss Incidents with a Simple System

Avoid Near-Miss Incidents with a Simple System

Bret McCormick
Region 2 Director
Stewart’s Electric Motor Works, Inc.
Orlando, Florida

Near Miss? Near Hit? Close Call?  

No one ever wants to hear these phrases. These unplanned incidents have the potential of causing serious damage or injury. A good number of these narrow escapes come from a lack of defining proper processes and procedures. Too many people think “no harm, no foul.” Unfortunately, this does not address the root issue. Someone could have been seriously hurt. Not addressing the underlying problem will undoubtedly allow it to happen again.

Avoiding high no-load amps on rewound motors

Avoiding high no-load amps on rewound motors

Tom Bishop, P.E. 
EASA Technical Support Specialist
 
Have you ever had to deal with a rewound motor that had high no-load amps? That is almost a rhetori­cal question as most of us have experienced this situation. The focus of this article will be on steps to take before rewinding in order to avoid the condition of high amps after the rewind. 

Steps that should be performed on every AC stator rewind: 

  1. Inspect the stator bore and rotor outside diameter for evidence of machining or damage. 
  2. Record the original winding data exactly as found. 
  3. Test the stator core before winding removal. 
  4. Verify the winding data. 
  5. Test the stator core after winding removal and cleaning. Applying these five steps will help avoid the vast majority of situations where a rewound motor will exhibit high no-load current. If these steps were not all followed and a motor has high no-load current, if possible, perform any steps above that were omitted. 

Axial hunting of 2-pole motors: Causes and cures

Axial hunting of 2-pole motors: Causes and cures

Chuck Yung 
EASA Technical Support Specialist 

A common observation about 2­-pole machines fitted with sleeve bearings is the inherent weak magnetic centering force. The classic symptom is chronic axial movement: a 2-pole rotor drifting “to and fro” from the established magnetic center position. This article addresses the numerous causes of this phenomenon, colloqui­ally referred to as “hunting.” Although the focus is on 2-pole motors, much of this information applies to sleeve bearing motors of any speed rating. Identifying the cause of a problem is good, but solutions are a lot more useful, so I’ve included those as well. 

We can use magnets to describe how a motor works. Opposite poles attract; like poles repel. The magnetic field rotating within the stator turns the rotor, and magnetic force affects the axial position of the rotor relative to the stator core. 

Balanceo Dinámico de los Impulsores de las Bombas

Balanceo Dinámico de los Impulsores de las Bombas

Gene Vogel
Especialiste de Bombas y Vibraciones

Al igual que con la mayoría de las otras máquinas reparadas comúnmente en los centros de servicio de EASA, el balanceo dinámico de los impulsores de las bombas es una cuestión importante. El desbalanceo excesivo imparte fuerzas sobre los rodamientos, reduciendo su vida útil y sometiendo los soportes de las máquinas a una energía vibratoria que deteriora las fundaciones.

Desde la perspectiva del balanceo dinámico, los rotores de las bombas difieren mucho de los de los motores eléctricos más populares. La masa del rotor de un motor eléctrico se encuentra entre los rodamientos y la longitud de los rotores exceden a sus diámetros. Muchos impulsores de las bombas se encuentran montados en voladizo y es probable que sean más angostos que sus diámetros. Los componentes angostos pueden requerir reglas especiales para asignar el desbalanceo residual permisible (según ISO 21940-11), y pueden ser necesarias técnicas especiales para un balanceo eficiente en la máquina balanceadora.

Beating the recession: Profit performance in a down year

Beating the recession: Profit performance in a down year

Dr. Al Bates, President
The Profit Planning Group
Boulder, Colorado

By almost any measure that can be used, 2009 was a tough year. However, even in the midst of a difficult econo­my, profit opportunities continued to exist. Just as in good times, some firms didn’t merely survive—they pros­pered. Understanding just how firms adapted to changing circumstances to keep generating adequate profits provides a basis for both immediate action and for future planning.

The recently completed 2010 EASA Operating Performance Report (of 2009 data) provides detailed financial and operating benchmarks for the in­dustry. As always, the primary benefit of the report is that it highlights the distinction between the performance of the typical firm and the high-profit firm. The differences are important in normal times; they are critical in tough times. (The following is based on 109 participants in the EASA 2010 Operating Performance Survey.)

Best AC Rewind Practices

Best AC Rewind Practices

Electrom InstrumentsPresented by Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

This webinar recording shares some of the “best practice” rewind methods used by (and learned from) EASA service centers around the world: connection recognition, best insulating materials, wire choices and tips to save time and effort. Topics covered include:

  • Slot liner, separators and phase insulation
  • Managing voltage stresses
  • Making the connection: solder, crimp fittings or silphos
  • Lacing tips
  • Testing the completed winding

This webinar is intended for experienced and prospective winders, and those who supervise winders.

Capacitor Testing for Electric Motors

Capacitor Testing for Electric Motors

Tom Bishop, P.E.
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

In this article, we will discuss testing of capacitors for electric motors in general and tests associated with specific uses of capacitors such as for power factor correction, and for electric motor starting (see Figures 1 and 2). For information on sizing power factor correction capacitors see Subsection 2.10 of the EASA Technical Manual, and for determining the correct size capacitor for a motor, see Subsection 2.11 of the EASA Technical Manual.

Causas y Soluciones de las Fugas en los Sellos Mecánicos de las Bombas

Causas y Soluciones de las Fugas en los Sellos Mecánicos de las Bombas

Gene Vogel
Especialista de Bombas and Vibraciones de EASA

En el principio, Dios hizo circular el agua libremente por toda la tierra. Entonces el hombre hizo las bombas para hacer fluir el agua donde él quería. Entonces Dios creó las fugas y el hombre creó los sellos de las bombas. Dios sonrió. El hombre continuó luchando contra las fugas en los sellos.

Para aquellos que son nuevos en el negocio de la reparación de bombas, los sellos pueden resultar intimidantes, sin embargo, es bien conocido que los sellos mecánicos de las bombas son dispositivos temperamentales que fallan con frecuencia. El hecho es que los sellos mecánicos son dispositivos simples que a menudo son utilizados de forma inadecuada, algunas veces instalados incorrectamente o tal vez montados en bombas que no son aptas para la aplicación. En la mayoría de las aplicaciones, los sellos mecánicos son lo suficientemente macizos para tolerar condiciones de operación y de manejo menos óptimas. Para aplicaciones exigentes todo debe estar bien.

Causes and Solutions for Leaking Pump Mechanical Seals

Causes and Solutions for Leaking Pump Mechanical Seals

Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

In the beginning, God made water to run freely over the earth. Then Man made pumps to make water run where he wanted it. Then God made leaks. Then Man made pump seals. God laughed. Man continues to struggle with leaking pumps seals.

For those new to pump repair, mechanical seals can be intimidating. It is commonly known that pump mechanical seals are temperamental devices that fail frequently. The fact is, mechanical seals are simple devices that are often misapplied, sometimes installed incorrectly, or perhaps installed on pumps that are not well suited for the application. For many applications, the mechanical seal is robust enough to tolerate less than optimal handling and operating conditions. For more demanding applications, everything must be right.

Circulating Currents in AC Stator Windings

Circulating Currents in AC Stator Windings

Presented by Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

This webinar recording discusses the equalized connections found in an increasing number of factory windings, explains why they are used, and addresses whether or not they are needed when converting a concentric winding to a lap winding. Alternatives, such as changing the number of circuits, or the special extra-long jumpers, are also compared.

The webinar recording covers

  • Explanation of why machine-wound concentric windings use equalizers
  • Effect of unbalanced voltage
  • Role of air gap in causing circulating currents
  • Labor involved and risk of failures due to increased complexity
  • How to properly locate the equalizers

This webinar is useful for engineers, service center managers, mechanics and sales representatives.

Cómo Probar y Evaluar la Condición del Núcleo de un Estator con la Prueba de Lazo (“Toroide” o Loop Test)

Cómo Probar y Evaluar la Condición del Núcleo de un Estator con la Prueba de Lazo (“Toroide” o Loop Test)

En Español

Carlos Ramirez
EASA Technical Support Specialist

¿El motor consume mucha corriente en vacío, aunque los datos del bobinado son correctos? ¿El motor se calienta con carga de forma inusual? Estas son preguntas comunes que pueden ser resueltas verificando la condición del núcleo del estator. En este webinario discutiremos cómo realizar la prueba de lazo en el núcleo de un estator y cómo analizar los resultados obtenidos, proporcionando información sobre los equipos utilizados, consejos para reparar el núcleo del estator y otras pruebas alternativas.

El seminario incluye:

  • Teoría de la prueba de lazo (“toroide”)
  • Procedimiento de prueba
  • Límites aceptables para las pérdidas y las temperaturas en el núcleo
  • Equipo asociado
  • Consejos para la reparación de núcleos dañados
  • Pruebas alternativas

Este webinario es útil para supervisores, bobinadores y personal encargado de realizar las pruebas.

Condiciones de Servicio Normales + Inusuales en Motores y Generadores

Condiciones de Servicio Normales + Inusuales en Motores y Generadores

Tom Bishop. P.E.
Especialista Sénior de Soporte Técnico de EASA

¿Cuáles son las condiciones normales para las que está diseñado un motor eléctrico? Esta es una pregunta que no surge muy a menudo, excepto cuando existe un problema con la aplicación.

La norma NEMA MG1 para motores y generadores proporciona detalles sobre este tema, definiendo las condiciones de servicio normales e inusuales. La norma IEC 60034-1, “Rotating Electrical Machines, Part 1 Ratings and Performance”, trata también algunas condiciones de aplicación en la cláusula 6, aunque no en la medida que lo hace la norma MG1. Nuestro enfoque estará basado en la norma MG1, ya que proporciona más detalles que la norma IEC 60034-1.

Conexiones Externas en los Motores Eléctricos Trifásicos

Conexiones Externas en los Motores Eléctricos Trifásicos

En Español

Presentado por Carlos Ramirez, EASA Technical Support Specialist

La conexión incorrecta de los motores eléctricos es una causa frecuente de fallo y es más común de lo que parece. La falta de información y la mala interpretación de los datos de placa son algunas de sus causas. En este webinario se explican los diferentes tipos de conexiones para los motores eléctricos trifásicos de una o varias velocidades con al menos 6 cables de salida y se comparan las equivalencias NEMA e IEC para el marcado de cables. La información proporcionada también será de gran utilidad para evitar el conexionado incorrecto en los diferentes voltajes. También incluye las conexiones por devanado partido (Part Winding) y como interpretar la información de la conexión de la placa de datos.

El webinar incluye:

  • Conexiones Estrella y Delta (“Triángulo”)
  • Conexiones para motores de una sola velocidad con al menos 6 cables de salida
  • Conexiones para motores de dos velocidades con al menos 6 cables de salida
  • Conexiones para Devanado Partido (Part winding)
  • Equivalencias NEMA e IEC para el marcado de cables  
  • Interpretación de la información de la conexión de la placa de datos

Este webinario es útil para supervisores, personal encargado de realizar pruebas y responsables del centro de servicio.

Three-Phase Motor External Connections
Misconnection of electric motors is a common cause of failure, and it’s more common than it seems. The lack of information and an incorrect interpretation of the nameplate information are some of its causes. This webinar will explain different connections that can be used in three-phase motors with 6 or more leads single-speed or multi-speed comparing NEMA and IEC labeling methods. Information provided will also be useful for avoiding misconnections at different voltages and includes part winding connections and nameplate information interpretation.

The webinar will include:

  • Wye and delta connections
  • 6 and more leads single-speed connections
  • 6 and more leads two-speed connections
  • Part winding connections
  • NEMA and IEC marking equivalents
  • Nameplate information interpretation
This webinar will be useful for service center managers, supervisors and test technicians.

 

Connecting NFPA 70E® Updates to Your Marketing

Connecting NFPA 70E® Updates to Your Marketing

Ron Widup
Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee Chair
Shermco Industries

How are your marketing efforts related to the latest changes in the National Fire Protection Association's electrical safety standard, NFPA 70E® Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace? The NFPA 70E® has a specific purpose, and it never mentions marketing. After all, these are two entirely different subjects. Or are they?

We should always think about safety. It needs to be top of mind every day for every task, whether you are standing in front of an energized piece of high-voltage equipment, driving through a school zone or cleaning the gutters on your roof. We all  agree that safety is important, but where is the connection to marketing? 

The NFPA 70E® (Article 90.1) says: 

The purpose of this standard is to provide a practical, safe working area for employees relative to the hazards arising from the use of electricity.

Let's apply the following five points to the latest changes found in NFPA 70E® and how they relate to marketing. You can apply these principles to similar thought streams, including new government rules and regulations, customer-specific requirements and ANSI/EASA AR100.

Consider holding an open house as a great way to market your business

Consider holding an open house as a great way to market your business

Andy Butz
Electric Motor Technologies
Cincinnati, Ohio
Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee Member

Looking for a good way to market your business? A great idea is to hold an Open House. An Open House is de­fined in the dictionary as a social event in which hospitality is extended to all. It is meant to be a fun-filled event. And it can be a great way to market your business to existing customers as well as new prospects. 

In the EASA Marketing Manual, there are step-by-step instructions on how to prepare and host an Open House. Our company followed these steps when we hosted a very successful one last fall. 

Consider the many advantages of business diversification

Consider the many advantages of business diversification

Iain Jenkins Jenkins Electric Co.
Charlotte, North Carolina
Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee Member

Recessions provide a fertile environment for learning about the importance of business diversity. As an EASA business manager for the last ten years, I’ve done my fair share of learning. The following are a few quick impressions of what diversity has meant in our company.

Effective diversification involves finding ways to apply your company’s existing assets, particularly your employees’ experience and skill-sets, to new markets. These “knowledge” assets take time to build, are hard to duplicate, and are much more versatile than a purpose-built machine or building. New markets include new industries, new customer types (utility, military, etc.), new geographical regions, and fulfilling different needs for the customers that you already serve.

Consideraciones Importantes Para Acondicionar la Reparación de Bombas en su Centro de Servicio

Consideraciones Importantes Para Acondicionar la Reparación de Bombas en su Centro de Servicio

Gene Vogel
Especialista de Bombas & Vibraciones de EASA

Esto sucede en casi todos los centros de servicio de EASA, aparece una máquina para reparación, con cables y un motor, pero es una bomba. A menudo es una bomba sumergible o de acoplamiento cerrado. Si su respuesta es: “Aquí no reparamos estos equipos” y está pensando: “Nosotros no sabemos nada sobre reparación de bombas” puede que le esté dando la espalda a un trabajo muy rentable.

Como ya detallé en mi artículo publicado en Febrero en la revista Currents, la reparación de bombas puede ser un área de expansión muy rentable para los centros de servicio especializados solo en la reparación de motores eléctricos. Si usted está de acuerdo en que la reparación de bombas sería una buena opción para su negocio, el próximo paso consiste en evaluar qué cambios necesita en sus instalaciones para incluir la reparación de bombas. Encontrará que ya tiene gran parte del equipo necesario. Las características de los motores y de las bombas centrífugas son muy similares y dependiendo del tipo de bomba, puede que necesite muy poco equipo adicional.

Consideraciones para convertir bobinados de alambre redondo a pletina (solera)

Consideraciones para convertir bobinados de alambre redondo a pletina (solera)

Chuck Yung
Especialista Sénior de Soporte Técnico de EASA

Con el aumento continuo de los tamaños de los motores CA y la obvia superioridad de los devanados con bobinas preformadas (pletina o solera), un área en la que podemos ayudar a mejorar la confiabilidad de los motores de nuestros clientes es rediseñando estos motores grandes de alambre redondo para que acepten bobinas preformadas. La mayoría de los reparadores estarían de acuerdo en que las máquinas de alambre redondo por arriba de 600 hp (450 kW) deberían rediseñarse con bobinas preformadas. Así mismo, aquellas con tensiones nominales superiores a 2 kV serían más confiables con bobinas de pletina.

Nadie quiere rebobinar un motor con 60 #14 AWG (62- 1.6 mm). Con la abundancia de proveedores especializados en laminaciones de estatores, el costo y la practicidad para convertir motores de alambre redondo a pletina está al alcance de casi todos los centros de servicio. Las laminaciones para reemplazar el núcleo pueden ser troqueladas o cortadas con láser o agua y entregadas en tiempos muy razonables.

Consideraciones para la resolución de los equipos de prueba & medida (M&TE)

Consideraciones para la resolución de los equipos de prueba & medida (M&TE)

Mike Howell
EASA Technical Support Specialist

La precisión y exactitud de los equipos de prueba & medida (M&TE) han sido tratadas en artículos previos de Currents (noviembre y diciembre de 2014). Un tema relacionado que no fue cubierto en dichos artículos es la resolución. El documento JCGM 200:2012 del Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology define resolución como: “El cambio más pequeño en una cantidad medida que causa un cambio perceptible en la indicación correspondiente”. Simplificado, es la diferencia más pequeña que puede ser medida por el equipo en cuestión. La exactitud de la M&TE debe ser mayor (menos exacto) o igual a la resolución. Es decir, durante la calibración, el M&TE debe ser capaz de indicar el valor comparado con el estándar.

Precisión y exactitud
Repasemos brevemente la importancia de la precisión y exactitud. Al recoger la información de las medidas, los técnicos del centro de servicio obtienen datos con dos componentes: El valor auténtico de la medida (valor real) y el error asociado a la medida (componentes de precisión y exactitud). Así mismo, entre más pequeño sea el error de medida, más se acerca la indicación o valor medido a la medida real. Como lo muestra la Figura 1, a menudo los términos precisión y exactitud se demuestran y diferencian gráficamente utilizando el ejemplo de la diana.

La precisión se refiere al grado de repetibilidad y reproducibilidad en el sistema de medida, Repetibilidad es la capacidad que tiene un técnico para obtener la misma medida varias veces midiendo el mismo elemento con el mismo M&TE. Reproducibilidad es la capacidad de varios técnicos para obtener la misma medida midiendo el mismo elemento con el mismo M&TE. Normalmente, la precisión del M&TE es evaluada con estudios de repetibilidad & reproducibilidad (R&R).

La exactitud es el grado en el que la medida concuerda con el valor real. La exactitud de un M&TE es evaluada por calibración.

Resolución
De nuevo, podemos simplificar la resolución como la diferencia más pequeña que puede ser medida con nuestro M&TE. Aunque para cualquier medida la exactitud de nuestro M&TE se debe comparar con nuestro rango de tolerancia aceptable.  Tendemos a ver rápidamente la resolución de un indicador o medidor solo por observación. Por esta razón, la resolución es un buen “primer paso” cuando se selecciona un M&TE para una tarea específica. Es decir, si usted tiene una herramienta con una resolución de 1 cm y necesita medir algo con un diámetro nominal de 1 mm+/-0.1mm, ya debería saber que tiene la herramienta incorrecta para el trabajo. 

Existen algunos ejemplos obvios de malas elecciones que podemos identificar en un típico centro de servicio. Nunca pensaríamos utilizar una balanza industrial para pesar los pesos de balanceo o una regla para medir el diámetro de un alambre magneto. En estos dos casos, sabemos que la resolución de un M&TE probablemente es más grande que el valor medido; si la resolución no está ahí, seguramente la exactitud deseada no estará ahí. La selección del M&TE apropiado depende del propósito de la medición. Para balancear, muchos pueden considerar apropiada una balanza con una exactitud de 0.1 gramos que pese hasta 100 gr. Pero, los centros de servicio que balancean rotores de husillos o conjuntos extremadamente largos pueden necesitar algo diferente. 

Para el alambre magneto, la precisión y exactitud requeridas para identificar simplemente un calibre durante la toma de datos pueden ser muy diferentes a las requeridas para determinar si las dimensiones de una muestra de alambre magneto están dentro de la tolerancia de fabricación de las normas NEMA o IEC. Además, una galga para alambres nunca es una buena opción para medir alambres magneto.

Los M&TE escogidos por cada centro de servicio variarán de acuerdo con los requisitos de diferentes fuentes como clientes y entes reguladores o de certificación. Siempre deben evaluarse primero los requisitos de los clientes antes de tomar cualquier decisión sobre el proceso de negocios. Un centro de servicio cuyo cliente más importante es un lavadero de vehículos puede tener requisitos muy diferentes a uno que repara motores relacionados con la seguridad de una central nuclear. Sin embargo, todos los centros de servicio deben escoger los M&TE adecuados para darles una seguridad razonable en las actividades de seguimiento del proceso e inspección y pruebas que realizan.

Cuando se trata del seguimiento de procesos, para la mayoría de parámetros existen muchos medidores y sensores que varían ampliamente por rango, resolución y exactitud. Por ejemplo, si se usa un manómetro en un sistema VPI donde el proceso está calibrado a 80±5 psi (5.5±0.3 bar) y el manómetro tiene un rango de 0-150 psi (0-10.3 bar), es razonable tener una calibración limitada, tal vez de 70-90 psi (4.8-6.2 bar). La Figura 2 muestra un manómetro que puede usarse de esa forma.

Ahora, veamos un parámetro diferente que debe ser controlado durante el ciclo de vacío-VPI. Durante un proceso de impregnación global-VPI, existe una fase de vacío seco y algunas veces también una fase de vacío húmedo. Normalmente, los niveles de vacío seco deben estar por debajo de los 5 Torr (0.007 bar) y es deseable alcanzar un nivel menor o igual a 1 Torr (0.001 bar), especialmente en estatores con bobinas de pletina. El manómetro de la Figura 2 sirve para algún proceso industrial simple pero no es adecuado para las mediciones de vacío en el proceso VPI de un centro de servicio. Examinemos la resolución de la porción de vacío de la escala, desde 0 hasta 30 pul-Hg. La Tabla 1 muestra las unidades para convertir pul-Hg en Torr. Si estamos interesados en niveles de vacío seco menores o iguales a 5 Torr, resulta evidente por que el manómetro de la Figura 2 es inadecuado. No se puede diferenciar un vacío de 0.5 Torr de un vacío de 10 Torr.

Esto no significa que si su centro de servicio tiene un manómetro de vacío inadecuado, no esté logrando niveles de vacío aceptables- esto solo significa que usted no tiene un control de proceso adecuado y no sabe el nivel de vacío que está obteniendo. Una opción más razonable para medir el vacío en un sistema VPI se muestra en la Figura 3. Un manómetro similar a este puede tener un rango de 0.2 a 20 Torr y una exactitud del 20%.

Los centros de servicio deben evaluar cada medida que afecte la calidad del servicio o producto suministrado. Para cada uno, considere el rango de valores posible, así como también la precisión y exactitud de los M&TE necesarios para realizar el trabajo. incluso para los técnicos más calificados y experimentados, contar con los M&TE es crítico para la disposición adecuada de cualquier máquina o componente.

Considerations for random to form winding conversions

Considerations for random to form winding conversions

Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

With a steady increase in random wound AC motor sizes and the obvious superiority of the form coil winding, one area where we can help improve customers' motor reliability is by redesigning those large random wound motors to accept form coils. Most repairers would agree that machines rated larger than 600 hp (450 kW) should be designed as form coil machines. Likewise, those rated over 2 kV will be much more reliable as form coil machines.

No one wants to rewind a motor using 60 #14 AWG (62- 1.6 mm) wires in hand. With an abundance of niche suppliers of stator laminations, the cost and practicality of converting a random wound motor to form coil are available to nearly all service centers. Replacement laminations can be punched, laser-cut or water-cut, and supplied with very reasonable delivery times.

Controlling Stator Copper Losses in Formed Coil Rewinds

Controlling Stator Copper Losses in Formed Coil Rewinds

Presented by Mike Howell
EASA Technical Support Specialist

EASA’s Energy Policy states that members will strive to ensure that the methods, techniques and materials they use to service and rebuild rotating electrical machines will maintain or improve their energy efficiency, whenever possible. Controlling stator copper losses during rewinds is a significant part of that effort. This webinar recording looks at several aspects of winding design to prevent increased temperature rise and decreased efficiency.

  • I2R losses and conductor area / length
  • Eddy current losses and laminated conductors
  • Circulating current losses and transposed conductors

This webinar recording will benefit service center managers, supervisors and technicians responsible for rewinds.

DC Machine Data Sheet

DC Machine Data Sheet

DC machine data form

This form will aid in collecting all needed information regarding a DC machine recieved for repair: nameplate data, armature coil data, armature dimensions, field winding data, field coil dimensions, general winding information as well as job and customer details.

This fillable PDF conveniently helps you save DC machine data for future reference. SImply copy the file or "Save As" to create a form for each motor you repair. The PDF includes a convenient button that can help you easily send DC data to EASA technical support.

DC Motor Electrical Procedures

DC Motor Electrical Procedures

6
presentations
$30
for EASA members

 

A special discounted collection of 6 webinar recordings focusing on DC motor electrical procedures.

Once purchased, all 6 recordings will be available on your "Downloadable products purchased" page in your online account.

Downloadable recordings in this bundle include:

The Basics: Understanding DC Motor Tests
Presented October 2016

  • Ampere turns of the armature, field and interpole data
  • Determining the best armature coil pitch
  • Verifying interpole circuits
  • Importance of brush angle
  • Equalizers and armature windings

Adjusting Brush Neutral
Presented June 2011

The webinar covers:

  • How to set brush neutral in DC machines.
  • Several methods of setting brush neutral along with the benefits and drawbacks of each.
  • Tips for permanent magnet and series-would machines.
  • Tips on how to recognize problems and settings that affect brush neutral, and what to check if the neutral adjustment seems higher than usual.

Target audience: This presentation is most useful for service center and field technicians involved in the repair of DC machinery, service center managers engineers, or anyone involved in DC motor or generator repair, as well as those who are simply looking to expand their understanding.


Carbon Brushes, Current Density and Performance
Presented June 2019

The lowly brush is underrated and misunderstood. The brush grade, brush pressure and spring tension, as well as the effect of load and humidity are each important to brush performance in DC machines, wound rotor motors, and synchronous machines.

This presentation covers:

  • Importance of brush grade
  • Effect of humidity and load (current)
  • Best practice method for removing brushes to improve performance
  • Brush pressure & spring tension by application
  • Supplemental cooling of slip ring / brush enclosures

Target audience: This presentation will benefit service center technicians and supervisors.


Drop Testing of Fields and Synchronous Poles: Tips to Interpretation
Presented November 2011

This presentation covers:

  • The basics of drop testing, as well as offers tips for interpreting the results.
  • Both the AC and DC drop test are described as well as the advantages and drawbacks for each.
  • For those cases where the drop test results are out of tolerance, this material will guide the technician in determining the reasons for the variation-how to recognize the difference between shorted coils and differences in iron, airgap or other influences.
  • Rewind and assembly tips will also be discussed, where they influence the results of the drop test.

Target audience: This presentation is most useful for service center and field technicians with at least 5 years experience, service center managers, engineers, or anyone involved in DC motor or generator repair, as well as those who are simply looking to expand their knowledge.


Final Testing of DC Machines
Presented September 2011

To assure a quality repair, there specific tests (such as neutral-setting and interpole-armature polarity) that should routinely be performed on every DC machine. When done correctly, the simple procedures presented will prevent scenarios such as that late night phone call from an irate customer whose DC machine is "arcing like a fireworks show."

Target audience: Technicians with at least a moderate lever of experience in DC machine repair will benefit from this session.


Advanced DC Testing
Presented April 2012

This presentation shares tips that are not covered in “Fundamentals of DC: Operation and Repair Tips,” such as:

  • Tips for interpreting armature and interpole tests
  • Finding that ground in the newly rewound armature
  • Interpreting questionable drop test results

It also covers final assembly tests including how to determine whether the cause of sparking is the interpoles or the armature.

Target audience: This presentation is aimed at the experienced technician and supervisor.

Determinando las Fuentes de Ruido en los Motores Eléctricos

Determinando las Fuentes de Ruido en los Motores Eléctricos

Tom Bishop, P.E.
Especialista Sénior de Soporte Técnico de EASA

A menudo, determinar la fuente del ruido en un motor eléctrico es más un desafío que corregirla. Sin embargo, un enfoque metódico puede reducir las causas posibles y por consiguiente facilitar la resolución del problema. Una advertencia aquí es que, si el ruido está relacionado con el diseño del motor, es decir, por un defecto de fabricación, puede que no sea posible o que no sea práctico obtener una solución.

En un motor eléctrico existen tres fuentes principales de ruido: Magnética, mecánica y por ventilación. Aquí discutiremos las causas y las características de cada una de ellas, proporcionando directrices para eliminar o reducir el ruido asociado con dichas fuentes.

Determining Impeller Trim Diameters for Pump Re-Applications

Determining Impeller Trim Diameters for Pump Re-Applications

Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

Whether it is a simple re-application of a pump from 50 Hz to 60 Hz (or vice versa), the repurposing of an existing pump, or the application of a new pump to an existing application, determining the proper trim for an impeller can be challenging. This presentation reviews: 

  • Basic impeller design criteria 
  • Methods of evaluating the head and flow and power implications of trimming impeller outside diameters

This recording will benefit pump technicians, engineers and sales personnel.

Determining Noise Sources in Electric Motors

Determining Noise Sources in Electric Motors

Tom Bishop, P.E.
EASA Technical Support Specialist

Determining the source of noise in a motor is often much more challenging than correcting it. However, a methodical approach to investigating the noise can narrow down the possible causes and therefore make it easier to resolve the noise issue. There is a caveat. If the cause of the noise is due to something in the motor design, that is, a manufacturing defect or anomaly, a solution may not be possible or practical.

There are three primary sources of noise in a motor: magnetic, mechanical and windage. We will discuss the causes and characteristics of each and provide guidance in dealing with reducing or eliminating the noise associated with them.

Don’t Let Your Biggest Asset Become Your Biggest Liability

Don’t Let Your Biggest Asset Become Your Biggest Liability

Paul K. Graser, CFE
Sr. Investigative Specialist
Edward Jones
St. Louis, Missouri

A company's most significant investment is typically in the people they hire. Companies spend time and money on training, but it's a necessary cost of business.  

Usually, small businesses hire employees based on previously established relationships or referrals from trusted contacts. The extent of formal background checks varies from business to business. Small businesses often don't have the resources to investigate prospective employees as comprehensively as larger corporations do.  

Despite the size of a company or the number of background checks performed, even the most honest employee can make a bad choice that could negatively impact the company. Fortunately, there are controls business owners can put in place to prevent employee fraud.

Drop Testing of Fields and Synchronous Poles: Tips to Interpretation

Drop Testing of Fields and Synchronous Poles: Tips to Interpretation

This presentation covers:

  • The basics of drop testing, as well as offers tips for interpreting the results.
  • Both the AC and DC drop test are described as well as the advantages and drawbacks for each.
  • For those cases where the drop test results are out of tolerance, this material will guide the technician in determining the reasons for the variation-how to recognize the difference between shorted coils and differences in iron, airgap or other influences.
  • Rewind and assembly tips will also be discussed, where they influence the results of the drop test.

Target audience: This presentation is most useful for service center and field technicians with at least 5 years experience, service center managers, engineers, or anyone involved in DC motor or generator repair, as well as those who are simply looking to expand their knowledge.

Dual voltage: Twice as much to go wrong?

Dual voltage: Twice as much to go wrong?

Dealing with voltage ratios and wye/delta connections

Chuck Yung 
EASA Technical Support Specialist 

In the world of three-phase electric motors, one area which seems to cause great confusion is the use of electric motors which are rated for more than one voltage. Especially today, with so much international commerce, it is understandable that different meanings might be assumed for this simple term. 

Those readers in the U.S. are ac­customed to “dual-voltage” 230/460v ratings. The 1:2 ratio lends itself to 9-lead windings, with connection combinations such as 1- and 2-circuit wye, 2 and 4-delta, 3 and 6-wye, etc. The common factor is that the circuits and the possible operating voltages have the same 1:2 ratio.

Dynamic Balancing on Pump Impellers

Dynamic Balancing on Pump Impellers

Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

As with most other machines commonly repaired in EASA service centers, dynamic balancing on pump impellers is an important concern. Excessive imbalance imparts forces on bearings, reducing their lives and subjecting machine mountings to vibratory energy that deteriorates foundations.

Pump rotors are quite different than more familiar electric motor rotors from a dynamic balance perspective. The mass of an electric motor rotor is between the bearings, and the rotors are longer than their diameters. Many pump impellers are mounted in an overhung configuration, and the impellers will likely be narrower than their diameters. Narrow components may require special rules for allocating allowable residual imbalance (per ISO 21940-11), and special balancing techniques may be needed for efficient balancing in the balancing machine.

EASA Accreditation: End-user and motor manufacturer perspectives

EASA Accreditation: End-user and motor manufacturer perspectives

Jerry Peerbolte
J. Peerbolte & Associates

Editor’s Note:  Following are some of the key findings in two industry research projects EASA conducted in conjunction with CFE Media and presented at the 2014 and 2015 EASA Conventions. Additional findings on other subjects will be published in future articles. 
 
A major strategic initiative for EASA was the development of an independent accreditation program for electric motor repair service centers. The most recent industry research projects afforded the opportunity to solicit the views of end-user customers and electric motors manufacturers about this initiative.

Let’s begin with end-users (customers). The research with this group was conducted in early 2014, prior to the official launch of the accreditation program. Hence, our research questions simply dealt with the general concept of such a program, as opposed to specific details of EASA’s.  

We found strong support for accreditation of motor repair service providers, with just over half of end-user respondents in favor.

Perhaps the more significant findings resulted from the follow-up questions presented to those who favored accreditation. As noted above, more than 90% suggested it would improve the quality of motor repairs. A similar percentage suggested they would add accreditation as a requirement to their motor repair specification, with nearly two-thirds showing a willingness to replace their existing motor repair service provider if they do not achieve accreditation. Finally, over half suggested they would also be willing to pay an added cost (on average, 10% more) for a repair from an accredited service provider.

 

Turning next to the motor manufacturer’s views, again there was strong support. This research conducted in the 2015 research project asked questions of senior executives from nine different companies. While most were not familiar with many details of EASA’s program, they expressed the ideas presented above.

EASA Marketing Manual

EASA Marketing Manual

EASA's Marketing Manual is a comprehensive 131-page guide that teaches a variety of marketing methods and explains how to use them in the local marketplace. This document contains background information on external factors in the marketplace and major observable trends in the business world, including consolidation of the customer/supplier base; e-commerce and chain supply management.

The material is presented in two sections:

  • Section I: The Marketing Plan
    This worksheet matrix is short and simple, but quite comprehensive in scope. It is a classic marketing planner used by companies in many industries to identify problems and opportunities for business growth.
  • Section II: The “How To”Section
    Here, we cover in “how to” language the various marketing tools that will help fulfill the business growth strategies set out in Section I.
    • Public Relations
      • News Releases
      • Customer Case Studies
      • Newsletters
      • Speakers' Bureau
      • E-Commerce Strategies
      • Trade Shows
      • Open Houses
      • Education and Training
    • Direct Marketing
      • Database Marketing
      • Direct Mail
      • Telemarketing
      • Lead Qualification
      • Direct Mail Costs
      • Direct Marketing Strategic Planning Worksheet
    • Sales Literature
      • EASA Materials
      • Capability Brochure
      • Manufacturer-Supplied Literature

EASA membership: Your opportunity to build a trusted alliance network

EASA membership: Your opportunity to build a trusted alliance network

Jerry Gray
Sloan Electromechanical Service & Sales

Being an EASA member can be so much more than putting the Associa­tion’s logo on your company web site and making the occasional “help!” phone call to one of EASA’s talented technical support specialists.  Of course there are so many other benefits. One of them is having the opportunity to build a “trusted” alliance network with other EASA members; doing this can truly help your customer, and thus help your business. When I use the term “trusted” alliance partner throughout this article, my intent is to point out the value of trust between other EASA members.

What is meant by “trusted”?
“Trusted” alliance means first and foremost that each EASA member respects the service or product being procured from the other member. As part of forming the trust, this requires that the owner or principals of the two EASA firms meet each other and agree that it is beneficial to do business with each other. 

As the ethical and legal basis of a business transaction ultimately rests with the credibility and honesty of each principal in both firms, a genuine re­spectful relationship between the two EASA members will result from the first successful business transaction.  

A second successful transac­tion result will yield TRUST, as trust is given after RESPECT is earned.  Each of these EASA members has now formed or expanded their trusted alliance network.This actually makes working within our industry much more enjoyable!

What does a trusted alliance look like?
To your customer, it looks trans­parent. Their perceptions of your company will evolve as your company demonstrates it can meet their growing expectations.

To your sales people, they now have a larger shopping basket with more resources.  They will have fewer opportunities in figuring out how to say politely say “no, we don’t do that or offer that.” Their sales will increase as will their attitudes!

From a detail perspective, here are some examples:
You are presented with a repair opportunity that is beyond your service center’s equipment handling capability.  There are some things your service center can do, but from a liability perspective, you recognize that your trusted alliance partner is better served if he does those tasks. Because of your relationship with the trusted alliance partner, both of you can have an honest, open discussion of the best way to handle the opportunity and manage the liability.  

Your organization chooses to: 

  1. Manage the customer transaction 
  2. Review the quality process and test reports from your alliance partner
  3. Perform the equipment commis­sioning with your customer

Your firm’s margin will be quite a bit less, but so is your liability.  In fact, you have leveraged your company’s resources by sourcing this work while maintaining the existing service center production schedule. Therefore, using your trusted alliance partner is actually more profitable as your  direct cost and overhead is minimal.

Another alliance example is sourc­ing equipment for your customer from a distributor who is an EASA member.  By using the trusted alliance partner, meaning both principals have met, respect has been earned and trust given, the alliance partner is offering your organization the most favorable product price to enable the sale. While the normal product margin may not be possible, your company is meeting your customer’s needs, which may lead to more opportunities.  

One other alliance example is sub­letting work to a trusted alliance part­ner to maintain a customer’s schedule. This can happen when the customer has a scheduled equipment shutdown and your service center load is already nearly full.  By having a trusted al­liance partner who is willing to do some component work (machining bearing fits, stator only rewinds, etc.), you are leveraging your service center and making the best use of everyone’s resources. 

Not every transaction is going to be in the best interest of your customer in using the alliance network.  Careful, judicious evaluation of your market, the value your organization adds, potential liability being incurred or shared and strengthening customer confidence are some of the important factors to consider.

Not every EASA member may be­come part of your trusted alliance net­work. But every EASA member has the potential of being in an alliance network.

How do you start an alliance?  
Meet your EASA peers and dis­cover their strengths!  Having great conversations, discovering shared values and openly acknowledging one another’s strengths is the foundation for starting a new alliance relationship.   

Make new business friends and potential trusted alliance network partners by attending chapter and re­gional meetings, joining a Roving Chief Executive (RCE) group, serving on one of EASA’s committees and attending the annual convention.    

Many EASA members already are part of a trusted alliance network.  They will readily agree that working in an alliance network has helped their customers and strengthened their business.

As I noted at the beginning, the benefits of being an EASA member can be much, much more than displaying the logo and an occasional phone call to St. Louis.  By participating in the networking opportunities I mentioned earlier, you have a great opportunity to team up, talk to an EASA member, share an experience (good or bad) and discover what a larger, enjoyable EASA community there is through being part of a “trusted” alliance. 

EASA Roving Chief Executive program - a value-added benefit

EASA Roving Chief Executive program - a value-added benefit

Chris Connor Globe Electric Co., Inc.
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Management Services Committee Member

When most people think about “social networking,” Facebook and Twitter probably come to mind. That’s great for the Internet, but for me there’s another (and much better) option. About twice a year, I participate in EASA’s own version of social networking: the Roving Chief Executive (RCE) Program.

EASA defines this program as “the bringing together of non-competing EASA owners/managers with similar problems for the exchange of information. EASA owners and managers meet in a confidential, small group setting to pool their talents and experience to solve mutual problems and concerns.”

A typical meeting schedule
Although it is up to RCE groups to set their own schedule and agenda, most generally begin on Friday and end on Sunday. The program can begin with a tour of the host’s service of business and speak candidly with the service center's employees. Of course each group is free to conduct meetings in any way it wants. On the following day, the meeting host focuses discussions on certain key problem areas. Information should be shared freely and often with a detailed look into the financials and other supporting documentation such as the EASA Operating

In most cases, the evening segues into a casual dining experience where the discussion is informal. Often times group members and their families become close friends who regularly contact each other between meetings to aid each other in specific situations that arise throughout the year.

The “Bruise Brothers”
My own situation has me as a member of the “Bruise Brothers” group (each group has a name that members agree upon). My feeling is that the group is so named for the brutally honest discussions and the tough love we dispense. This group’s first meeting was held on July 1, 1995 at Joilet Equipment in Joliet, Illinois. The group met last in September 2009 when we got together at my company, Globe Electric, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

There are no signs that the group will slow down anytime soon. We already have our next meeting set for this month (February) at Stewart’s Electric Motor Works in sunny Orlando, Florida. (Hint to the cold weather members: Always schedule your winter meetings in the southern-most locations.)

A valuable, rewarding experience
I had asked the “brothers” in my group to provide me with some assistance with filling the blank spaces in this article. I was amazed at the similarity of the responses. All stressed the importance of the close friendships they have formed through the years. Additionally, it was stressed that all attendees will leave with something concrete they can use to benefit their own companies. One of the members in my group calls us “his personal group of professional consultants.”

During my time in the “Bruise Brothers,” I have learned more from these meetings than any business class I attended in college. The “real world experience” that this group of owners and managers brings to the table is priceless. I urge every EASAn to look into this program.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE RCE PROGRAM

EASA Tech Notes

EASA Tech Notes

The latest revisions of EASA Tech Notes are now included as part of the EASA Technical Manual (as of 2012). Tech Notes will no longer be issued as separate documents once they have officially be incoporated into the EASA Technical Manual.

The list below will help you locate these latest revisions.

List updated 10/1/2019

Number Title Page of the EASA Technical Manual
1 Hoist Troubleshooting Withdrawn
2 Function of the Interpole in DC Machines 3-29
3 Connecting the Variable-Speed Commutator Motor 2-175
4 Frog-Leg Windings for DC Machines 3-49
5 Dynamometer Testing Electric Motors 7-30
6 New International Connection Diagrams for Foreign 6- and 12-Lead Wye-Delta Motors 2-40
7 Suffixes to NEMA Frames 2-6
8 Understanding Motor Efficiency and Power Factor (replaced with The Impact of Voltage and Frequency Variation on Motor Life and Performance) 2-83
9 TIG-Welded Commutator Connections 3-47
10 Winding Connections for Multi-Mode Three-Phase Motors 2-165
11 Voltage Stresses in Three-Phase, AC Motors (Withdrawn and replaced with: Voltage Stress: Not as Simple as It Sounds) 2-218
12 Conversion Factors for Lap and Concentric Windings 2-188
13 Solid Round Magnet Wire Data 6-2
14 The Commutator and Its Maintenance 3-41
15 Some Aspects of Magnetic Centering Effects on Sleeve Bearing Induction Motors 10-97
16 Guidelines for Maintaining Motor Efficiency During Rebuilding 2-99
17 Stator Core Testing Withdrawn
18 Troubleshooting a DC Motor at the Job Site 3-53
19 Lubrication of Rolling Bearings in Electric Machines Withdrawn
20 Cause and Analysis of Anti-Friction Bearing  Failures in AC Induction Motors (Now titled: The Cause and Analysis of Bearing Failures in Electric Motors) 8-33
21 Thrust Anti-Friction Bearings for Vertical Motors (Now titled: Understanding and Adjusting Thrust Rolling Bearing Systems for Vertical Motors) 8-23
22 Brushholders and the Performance of Carbon Brushes 3-33
23 Testing of Squirrel Cage Rotors 7-27
24 UL 1446 Systems of Insulating Materials 6-18
25 Rewinding Inverter Duty Motors 2-221
26 Can Energy Efficient Motors Be Rewound Satisfactorily? (replaced with The Effect of Repair/Replace
on Motor Efficiency)
2-102
27

The Cause and Analysis of Bearing and Shaft Failures in Electric Motors
• Bearing Failures
• Shaft Failures


8-33
10-101

28 Assuring the Mechanical Integrity of Electric Motors 10-4
29 Application Considerations of Pulse-Width Modulated Inverters 5-33
30 Fabrication of Replacement Shafts For Electric Motors 10-119
31 The Cause and Analysis of Stator and Rotor Failures in AC Induction Machines 2-120
32 Standards for Dynamic Balancing 10-17
33 Taking Data on Form-Wound Motors and Generators 2-235
34 PWM Amplifiers 5-8
35 Rewinding Form-Wound Motors and Generators 2-241
36 Armature Banding With Fiberglass 10-93
37 Interspersed Windings: What Are They? 2-153
38 Repairing Sleeve Bearings 8-42
39 Procedure Writing: It Takes A Little Time, But The Results Are Worth It Withdrawn
40 An Analytical Approach to Solving Motor Vibration Problems 10-27
41 Electric Motor Shaft Analysis 10-115
42 Procedures for Checking End Play in Ball Bearing Machines 8-50
43 Making and Installing a New Motor Shaft 10-123
44 Guide for Procuring Form Wound Coils for Motors and Generators 2-239
45 Servo Drives 5-24
46 The (Potential) Pitfalls of Parallel Circuits 2-211
47 Concentric-to-Lap / Lap-to-Concentric Conversions 2-177
48 Squirrel Cage Rotor Testing See Section 7
49 Simple Troubleshooting of Amplifiers in the Field 5-17

Easy steps to improve quality at your service center

Easy steps to improve quality at your service center

Charles Bailey
Technical Education Committee Member

Most of us have heard the remark: “We’ve done it this way for the past 25 years. Why would we want to change now?”  But most of us also know that this kind of thinking can get us in trouble. Some of the methods that have been utilized over a long period of time are not necessarily the best; they could affect your business. Many times these processes are based on convenience rather than acceptable procedures.  

Economic challenges spark new division + successful ideas for inside sales

Economic challenges spark new division + successful ideas for inside sales

Kevin Krupp
York Repair, Inc.
Bay City, Michigan
Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee Member

Like many EASA firms, York Re­pair, Inc. has been heavily impacted by the recession. Our location in Mid-Michigan, with a heavy automo­tive manufacturing customer base, has created additional challenges. However, we’ve found that with each challenge comes the potential for op­portunity.

To meet the current challenge, we decided to re-allocate some of our staff to a new venture called RepairZoneTM, a division that specializes in indus­trial electronics and servo motor sales through exchange, repair, or purchase. RepairZone is primarily a Web-based division, accessible at www.repair­zone.com; one of our main goals is to drive traffic to the site.  

Economy 2020 and Beyond: Seeking Clarity

Economy 2020 and Beyond: Seeking Clarity

Brian Beaulieu
ITR Economics

This highly-rated economist will discuss the leading economic indicators, which continue to be in chaos given the worldwide pandemic. He will recommend the best course of action for the most important part of the economy – you and your business.

Electromechanical Repair

Electromechanical Repair

7
presentations
$35
for EASA members

 

A special discounted collection of 7 webinar recordings focusing on various aspects of electromechanical repair.

Once purchased, all 7 recordings will be available on your "Downloadable products purchased" page in your online account.

Downloadable recordings in this bundle include:

Time-Saving Repair Tips
Presented August 2014

This webinar shares:

  • The secrets used by other service centers to gain a competitive edge in the repair process.
  • Mechanical, winding and machining tips reduce repair time, help avoid unnecessary rework, and decrease turn-around time.

Target audience: Supervisors, machinists, mechanics, winders, and sales personnel who interact with the end user.


Repair Best Practices to Maintain Motor Efficiency
Presented June 2012

There are certain repair processes, such as winding removal and replacement, that can impact the efficiency and reliability of electric motors. Prudent repair practices must not increase overall losses, and preferably should maintain or reduce them.

This presentation explains how those repair processes affect efficiency and reliability, and gives the best repair practices in order to maintain or improve efficiency.

Target audience: This presentation is most useful for service center inside and outside sales representatives, customer service personnel, engineers, supervisors and managers. The content will be beneficial for beginners through highly experienced persons.


Practical Problem Solving for the Entire Service Center
Presented August 2013

This presentation focuses on a report format developed by Toyota for a simple, yet methodical approach to document improvement. Whether you're dealing with problems related to sales, purchasing, repair or testing, if all team members can learn to speak the same, simple problem-solving language, they can tackle problems efficiently and effectively.

Target audience: This presentation is best suited for executives, managers, team leaders and front line supervisors from the office and service center who want to understand and implement such a program.


Induction Motor Speed Control Basics
Presented March 2019

Induction motors are most often applied to what are essentially constant speed drive applications. However, the use of induction motors in variable speed applications continues to grow, primarily due to technology advances in power electronics. This webinar will review speed control basics for induction machines.

  • Wound-rotor motor speed control
  • Squirrel-cage speed control by pole changing
  • Squirrel-cage motor speed control by variable voltage, fixed frequency
  • Squirrel-cage speed control by variable voltage, variable frequency

AC Motor Assembly and Testing
Presented August 2018

This webinar recording focuses on:

  • Motor assembly issues
  • Electrical and mechanical inspection
  • Static and run testing
  • AC motors with ball, roller and sleeve bearings

Target audience: This webinar recording is most useful for service center mechanics, supervisors and engineers. The content will also be beneficial for machinists, managers and owners.


On-Site Testing & Inspection of Electric Motors
Presented July 2015

This webinar covers electrical testing and inspection of installed electric motors, including:

  • Condition assessment for continued service
  • Diagnostic fault testing and interpretation
  • Physical inspection key points

 


Selecting Replacement DC and 3-Phase Squirrel Cage Motors
Presented September 2019

On many occasions, a different motor type is desired or needed. In these cases it is essential that the replacement motor provides the required performance, and do so reliably.

This presentation focuses primarily on the electrical aspects of selecting replacement motors. It also addresses speed and torque considerations.

  • DC motor to DC motor
  • DC motor to 3-phase squirrel cage motor
  • AC motor to 3-phase squirrel cage motor

Target audience: Anyone involved with selecting replacement motors or diagnosing issues with replacement motor installations.

E-mail: An overlooked opportunity to sell

E-mail: An overlooked opportunity to sell

George Flolo, Chair
Marketing & Industry Awareness  Committee
The Flolo Corp.
Bensenville (Chicago), Illinois

One important selling principle is to keep your company’s name and your name in front of the customer as often as possible.

The personal sales call is the best selling tool for this purpose. However, it can be time-consuming and expensive, and can lose its effect in a short time without another method of follow up. 

Another method to get one’s name out is through the use of flyers/mail­ers with special offers or announce­ments of new products or services. Properly positioned, this method does benefit you even without a purchase because your corporate identity is at least seen. Even though this method is a fraction of the cost of a sales call, it still has a significant cost compared to what I call “Enhanced E-mail.”

Emerging Motor Technologies

Emerging Motor Technologies

Presented by Tom Bishop, P.E.
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

Following the squirrel cage induction motor, what will come next? This webinar provides an overview of potential successor technologies.

  • Permanent magnet (PM) motors
    • Hybrid permanent magnet (HPM) motors
    • Across the line start PM (LSPM) motors
    • High torque low speed PM motors
    • Surface permanent magnet (SPM) motors
    • Interior permanent magnet (IPM) motors
  • Reluctance motors
    • Synchronous reluctance motors (SynRM)
    • Switched reluctance motors (SRM)
  • Other motor technologies nearing reality
    • Amorphous metal designs
    • Axial flux ferrite PM motors

This webinar benefits anyone dealing with sales, service or repair of these and other emerging technology motors.

End Users Offer Perspective on Internet-Enabled Condition Monitoring

End Users Offer Perspective on Internet-Enabled Condition Monitoring

Paul Rossiter
Ad Hoc Committee on Emerging Technologies Member
Energy Management Corp.
Salt Lake City, Utah

In my Currents article last January, I discussed the newly formed Ad Hoc Committee on Emerging Technologies, chaired by Art Anderson, and mentioned that I thought there would be continued movement in the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) space. Specifically, I said I believed the discussion would increase around the IIoT topic, more companies would be coming into our space using this technology and that customers would begin to increase their adoption.

Enhance Your Market Position Using EASA's Recommended Practices

Enhance Your Market Position Using EASA's Recommended Practices

Do customers and prospects view your company as just another EASA repair facility? Not sure? The most successful EASA members have learned to position their businesses in a way that is not like all others.

How do they achieve this uniqueness? It’s not through fancy marketing, websites or slick-talking salespeople. Rather, it is a business strategy that provides superior service by demonstrating adherence to EASA’s recommended practices. Note: This is not a technical session. It is a strategic marketing session that illustrates how your company can enhance customer value.

Some of the EASA standards addressed include:

  • ANSI/EASA AR100-2010: Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus
  • Root Cause Failure Analysis
  • The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor Efficiency: EASA/AEMT Rewind Study and Good Practice Guide to Maintain Efficiency

Envío de Motores Eléctricos 101

Envío de Motores Eléctricos 101

Chuck Yung
Especialista Sénior de Soporte Técnico de EASA

Es simple asumir que el envío de un motor eléctrico es tan fácil como ponerlo encima de un camión, pero nada podría estar más alejado de la realidad. Este artículo cubrirá las recomendaciones para efectuar el envío de motores y refuerza el hecho de que enviar un motor no solo consiste en entregarlo, sino que también incluye recogerlo. Existen cosas que nosotros (o una compañía de transporte) podemos hacer mal y que podrían derivar en reparaciones costosas.

Errors Are Human Nature; Negative Events Result from System and Process Breakdowns

Errors Are Human Nature; Negative Events Result from System and Process Breakdowns

Paul Idziak
Management Services Committee Member
Shermco Industries, Inc.

Are we doing everything we can to support our employees, or are we looking to assign blame when things don’t go right?

We have all heard the buzzphrases like “finding your why” and “human performance.” While not new, consider looking at this area from a different perspective.

European Commission announces motor and power converter efficiency directive regulation

European Commission announces motor and power converter efficiency directive regulation

Rob Boteler
Confluence Energy LLC

On October 22, the European Commission submitted its plan to expand motor and power converter efficiency regulations. As part of the EcoDesign directive, the Commission has been working on expanded motor and drive regulations for several years. The European Union directive will address both motors and variable frequency drives (VFDs) from .75 to 1,000 kW (1 to 1340 hp).

Efficiency directives in Europe are drafted by the Commission with individual countries responsible for enforcement. Unlike the USA where the regulation is promulgated and enforced at the federal level through the Department of Energy, each country within the EU has enforcement responsibility. Though some complain that the DOE rule making process is very lengthy and stressful, it does provide all interested parties with an opportunity to be heard. The EU Commission also has a process for the development of regulations, and many would argue that the manufacturers are somewhat less of an integral part of the EU process.  

The directive that will cover the new EU motor and power converter regulations is referred to as the “annex EN.” It has yet to receive its reference number. EC640/209, the current directive, will be replaced. 

Covered motor products
Beginning January 15, 2021, the energy efficiency of three-phase motors with a rated output equal to or above 0.75 kW (1 hp), and equal to or below 1,000 kW (1340 hp), with 2, 4 or 6 poles, which are not brake motors, increased safety motors, or other explosion-protected motors, shall correspond to at least the IE3 efficiency level. This should align with NEMA Premium 50 Hz.

Beginning July 1, 2022, the energy efficiency of three-phase motors with a rated output equal to or above 0.12 kW (0.16 hp) and below 0.75 kW (1 hp), single-phase motors with a rated output equal to or above 0.12 kW (0.16 hp), and increased safety motors with a rated output equal to or above 0.12 kW (0.16 hp) and equal to or below 1,000 kW (1,340 kW) shall correspond to at least the IE2 efficiency level.

Also, the energy efficiency of three-phase motors with a rated output equal to or above 0.75 kW (1 hp) and equal to or below 1,000 kW (1,340 hp) with 2, 4, 6 or 8 poles, that are not increased safety motors, shall correspond to at least the IE3 efficiency level. 

The directive includes AC motors that NEMA would describe as special or definite purpose, making this new regulation quite broad in the range of covered products. The EU directive does include motors that cannot be tested with the addition of a temporary endshield. 

The directive will not include air over (AO), totally encloseTENV, high ambient (60° C), high altitude (4,000 meters [13,000 feet]), low ambient (-40° C) and maximum operating temperature (400° C). Additionally, the directive exempts integral brake motors and integral motors and controls (IMACs). 

The directive does not include technologies other than AC. However, it is not clear if there is any distinction within the single-phase designs (cap start cap run, cap star induction run, etc.).

Covered variable speed drives 
The regulation covers variable speed drives with three phases input that are rated for operating with one motor within the 0.75 kW – 1,000 kW (1 to 1340 hp) motor rated output range, have a rated voltage above 100 V and up to and including 1,000 V AC, and have only one AC voltage output.

Variable speed drive (VSD) means an electronic power converter that continuously adapts the electrical power supplied to the motor to control the motor’s mechanical power output according to the torque-speed characteristic of the load driven by the motor, by adjusting the power supply to a variable frequency and voltage supplied to the motor. 

Product information requirements for motors 
According to the regulation, the product information requirements below shall be visibly displayed on the technical data sheet or user manual supplied with the motor; the technical documentation for the purposes of conformity assessment pursuant to Article 5; on websites of the manufacturer of the motor, its authorized representative, or the importer; and the technical data sheet or user manual supplied with products in which the motor is incorporated.

The exact wording used in the following list does not need to be repeated. The information may be displayed using clearly understandable graphs, figures or symbols rather than text: 

  • Rated efficiency (ηN) at the full, 75% and 50% rated load and voltage (UN), determined based on the 50 Hz operation and 25° C ambient reference temperature
  • Efficiency level: “IE2,” “IE3,” “IE4” or “IE5,” as determined as specified in the first section of this annex, followed by the term “-motor” 
  • Manufacturer’s name or trade mark, commercial registration number and address
  • Product’s model identifier
  • Number of poles of the motor
  • The rated power output(s) PN or range of rated power output (kW)
  • The rated input frequency(s) of the motor (Hz)
  • The rated voltage(s) or range of rated voltage (V)
  • The rated speed(s) or range of rated speed (rpm) 
  • Whether single-phase or three-phase
  • Information on the range of operating conditions for which the motor is designed: 
    • altitudes above sea-level
    • minimum and maximum ambient air temperatures including for motors with air cooling
    • water coolant temperature at the inlet to the product, where applicable 
    • maximum operating temperature
    • potentially explosive atmospheres
  • Information relevant for disassembly recycling or disposal at end-of-life; 
  • If the motor is considered exempt from efficiency requirements in accordance with Article 4(2) of this Regulation: the specific reason why it is considered exempt. 

For motors exempt from the efficiency requirements in accordance with Article 4(2)(m) of this regulation, the motor or its packaging and the documentation must clearly indicate, “Motor to be used exclusively as spare part for” and the product(s) for which it is intended.

Efficiency requirements for variable speed drives 
Efficiency requirements for variable speed drives shall apply as follows: the power losses of variable speed drives rated for operating with motors with a rated output equal to or above 0.75 kW (1 hp) and equal to or below 1,000 kW (1,340 hp) shall not exceed the maximum power losses corresponding to the IE2 efficiency level.

Conclusions
This is the first regulation for VSD efficiency. Overall, the directive maintains references to IEC standards for both motors and VSDs that have been developed in collaboration with industry, regulators and energy advocates. Test methods will use IEC 60034, which delivers results similar to IEEE 112 or CSA 390.

The regulation in its entirety may be found at https://bit.ly/2PG0VaD.

The efficiency levels also reference IEC levels IE2 and IE3. Note that the directive includes a reference to IE4 and IE5 levels, which are not scheduled for implementation. Unlike NEMA, IEC has one efficiency table regardless of enclosure type calculated at 1.0 SF. 

One issue that will face motor manufacturers is the smaller size of IEC motors to power ratio. In some cases, this will force motors to jump one frame size. End-users and OEMs buying these higher efficiency motors will need to be cognizant of possible changes to the motor’s size that may cause form, fit and function issues in a specific application.

Evolution of Sales: Web Search Secrets to Find the Right Leads, At the Right Time, With the Right Message

Evolution of Sales: Web Search Secrets to Find the Right Leads, At the Right Time, With the Right Message

Business Development for Any Economic Environment

Sam Richter
SBR Worldwide, LLC

During times of uncertainty, you have three choices as it relates to sales:

  1. Curl up, feel sorry for yourself and hope things get better soon
  2. Identify prospects and start building relationships so when we return to some sense of normalcy, your business development efforts are ready to hit the ground running
  3. Identify opportunities that need your solutions right now, and reach out in a highly relevant and highly differentiated way. 

Option 1 is not really an option. For Options 2 and 3: What worked in the past won’t necessarily work today and might never work again. The answer: Leverage sales intelligence to locate the right prospects at the right time with the right message. 
In this dynamic program, discover: 

  • How to generate opportunities using sales trigger events and powerful introductions so that you’re calling on the prospects who most likely need your solution, right now. 
  • How to use search engines, social media and the Invisible Web as powerful sales and competitive “intelligence agents,” ensuring you know how to align your value proposition to what prospects care about. 
  • How to leverage information to make a great impression, ensure relevancy, gain permission to ask challenging questions and provide ongoing value to both prospects and customers. 

The Evolution of Sales is not a new sales process – so you’re not starting over. Rather, it’s an evolution of how to identify opportunities and approach prospects in ways where your message is welcomed and appreciated – even in tumultuous times. Plus, what you learn and implement today will work even better when our world returns to some sense of normalcy.

Expanding Your Marketing Efforts

Expanding Your Marketing Efforts

Crystal Bristow

Jenkins Electric Co.
Charlotte, North Carolina

Whether you have a dedicated marketing specialist or an employee willing to add the responsibility to their plate, check out a few easy steps to grow your marketing efforts.  

Walk It Out: Ask the person responsible for marketing to walk around the service center frequently. Have them ask the technicians what they are working on and what exciting projects they see. This is the first step in building a continuous stream of marketing content.  

Ask For Help: Ask technicians, engineers and mechanics to send you their photos from the field, in the shop and especially from jobs “they have never done before.” If the job is interesting for them, your audience will likely find it engaging. As a marketer, you can’t be everywhere, but as your technical team starts to share unique projects reflexively, you’ll be surprised by what comes your way.  

Befriend Your Delivery Driver: Your delivery drivers are among your most influential and knowledgeable marketing sources. Create a small literature packet, give them a stash of promotional items to hand out to key customers and share the types of customers and projects of interest. They know about every project coming your way, so use that to your advantage!  

Check Your Facts: When your technical team shares a photo and the technical details of a job, circle back with the content you create to ensure accuracy.

The more employees feel like they’re part of your organization’s marketing efforts, the more information and content they will supply. 

Explore Leadership, Vision + Culture in 2020

Explore Leadership, Vision + Culture in 2020

Jan Schmidlkofer
Management Services Committee Chair
K&N Electric Motors, Inc.

Last year, the Management Services Committee provided content regarding lean service throughout 2019, as that was of the utmost importance in many members’ minds. Hopefully, you were able to take some of our ideas and experiences and implement lean service in your service center! 

Moving forward for 2020, vision and culture in leadership were specifically mentioned as topics of interest in a recent survey. Over the next several months, Management Services Committee members will share their lessons and expertise in a focused article series on this robust topic.

Fact or Myth: Common Misconceptions About Motors

Fact or Myth: Common Misconceptions About Motors

Tom Bishop, P.E.
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

An old saying claims: “If it’s in black and white, it must be right.” Seeing something in writing makes it more believable than the spoken word. However, that does not mean it is true. We should always look for substantiation to back up statements, whether written or verbal.

A more recent saying is: “If it’s on the Internet, it must be true.” Apply that same fact-check here. Look for substantiation before accepting information gleaned from the Internet.  

Here is a random collection of some relatively common misconceptions about three-phase squirrel cage motor performance characteristics.

Fall Protection: Preventing Avoidable Accidents

Fall Protection: Preventing Avoidable Accidents

Dale Hamil
Technical Education Committee Member
Illinois Electric Works

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Hazard Administration (OSHA) recently released revised data for the top 10 OSHA violations for the 2019 fiscal year. For the ninth consecutive year, Standard Number 1926.501: General Requirements for Fall Protection lands at number one with 7,014 violations.

 

Fitting Sleeve Bearings

Fitting Sleeve Bearings

Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

When sleeve bearings are rebabbitted or replaced, an important step during assembly is to check the contact between the sleeve bearing and the journal which rides in it. The use of self-aligning sleeve bearings (also called spherical or ball fit) renders this step almost unnecessary. Still, cylindrical sleeve bearings should be inspected to make sure the contact area is sufficient.   

Sleeve bearings, also known as babbitt bearings, plain bearings or white metal bearings, have been in use for over 150 years. For a detailed explanation of sleeve bearing design and operation, request the EASA 2007 Convention paper, “Sleeve Bearing Repair Tips,” or see Mechanical Repair Fundamentals of Electric Motors, 2nd Edition.  

This article is specific to checking and correcting the wear pattern when installing a new sleeve bearing in an electric motor. Fitting a sleeve bearing is not difficult; it just requires some basic knowledge. An interesting bit of history: the toolkit provided with the old Model A Ford automobile included a babbitt knife for scraping crankshaft bearings. Imagine dismantling your engine alongside the road to remove and fit the babbitt bearings.

Five-year performance analysis provides valuable insights

Five-year performance analysis provides valuable insights

The accompanying set of exhibits provides an overview of financial trends in distribution between 2004 and 2008. It places special emphasis on the changes between 2007 and 2008. The information related to EASA comes from data provided by participants in the Operating Performance Survey.

The analysis covers forty different lines of trade in distribution. In developing such a macro-view of distribution, it is not possible to compare most financial ratios directly. For example, some industries have a high gross margin and accompanying high expenses, while others have a low gross margin and low expenses.

What is possible is to compare the direction and magnitude of change. The emphasis is on how much performance changed during the time period covered. The changes are highly instructional in analyzing current issues in distribution and in planning for future periods of economic uncertainty. 

Follow these procedures, guidelines when rebuilding collector rings

Follow these procedures, guidelines when rebuilding collector rings

Chuck Yung 
EASA Technical Support Specialist 

When repairing slip-ring machines, it is sometimes necessary to re-insulate the collector rings from the hub. In these cases, some proce­dural guidelines may be helpful. Specifics such as interference fit, type of insulating material, and type of ring material require careful attention.

Free training! Or, at least how to get some funding for your training program

Free training! Or, at least how to get some funding for your training program

Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

The training issue is so critical that many state and provincial governments in the U.S. and elsewhere offer financial help to good employers—such as the electrical apparatus service and sales industry—for training. These programs are usually administered through state employment offices and are not to be confused with programs for the “chronically unemployed.” 

Here’s An Example From A Fellow EASAN 
Ron Widup, general manager of Shermco Industries in Dallas, Texas, recently secured a substantial training grant from a state-administered program. Texas has a proactive training assistance program (called SmartJobs) which provides training grants of up to $3,000 per employee per year.

The program requires in-kind matching by the grant recipient. This does not mean that a $100,000 grant requires a business to invest $100,000. “In-kind matching” varies from 10 percent to 100 percent, depending on the size of the company. 

It Gets Better 
The company contribution includes total legitimate training costs, including the employees’ wages (for schooling and training time), cost of training materials (e.g., the EASA Vo-Tech training program), and administrative costs. Even capital expenses for training equipment or facilities are covered under some programs. 

The particulars vary from state to state, but there is often financial help available for those serious about improving the quality of their workforce. And the application process requires less effort than for a U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) loan.

For more information, contact your state or province economic development department. 

Fundamentos de los Motores de Reluctancia Conmutada

Fundamentos de los Motores de Reluctancia Conmutada

Por Mike Howell
Especialista de Soporte Técnico de EASA

Los motores de reluctancia conmutada (SRM), también conocidos como motores de reluctancia variable (VRM), tienen su origen a mediados de 1830. Estos motores fueron usados como motores de tracción ferroviaria. Sin embargo, la electrónica de potencia necesaria para controlar satisfactoriamente los SRMs, no fue patentada hasta comienzos de los 70´s. Esto implicaba una conmutación electrónica sincronizada con la posición del rotor. Los centros de servicio están notando un incremento en el número de SRMs que reciben para reparar y algunos de los técnicos no están familiarizados con su funcionamiento. Como cualquier otra máquina rotativa, un conocimiento básico de los principios de funcionamiento puede ayudar a detectar problemas y durante la reparación. Uno de los puntos más críticos para el personal del centro de servicios es entender de antemano que estas máquinas no pueden ser operadas sin un drive especial, el cual normalmente necesita ser suministrado por el usuario final o el fabricante.

Fundamentos de los Motores Sincrónicos

Fundamentos de los Motores Sincrónicos

Mike Howell
Especialista de Soporte Técnico de EASA

Los avances en la electrónica de potencia en las últimas décadas han permitido el uso de una variedad de máquinas eléctricas rotativas que de otro modo no sería factible. Una de ellas se denomina máquina de reluctancia debido a la forma en la que dichas máquinas producen un torque electromagnético. Una máquina de reluctancia es una máquina eléctrica en la cual el torque se produce por la tendencia de su parte móvil a moverse a una posición donde se maximiza la inductancia del devanado excitado. En un artículo publicado en Currents en marzo de 2020, se trató el tema del motor de reluctancia conmutada (SRM), mientras que este artículo se centrará en el motor sincrónico de reluctancia (SynRM). Demos un vistazo a algunas de sus similitudes y diferencias.

Getting to Know Reluctance Machines

Getting to Know Reluctance Machines

Mike Howell
EASA Technical Support Specialist

Reluctance machines offer simple construction, high power density and low cost. Over time, advancement in power electronics will increase the prevalence of these machines in a number of applications, creating repair opportunities for service centers. This recording explores features of synchronous and switched reluctance machines.

  • Basic magnetic circuits
  • Reluctance machines and torque production
  • Slots, poles and phases
  • Concentrated windings vs. lap or concentric windings
  • Rewind, test and inspection

This recording will benefit service center managers, supervisors and technicians.

Good Practice Guide to Maintain Motor Efficiency

Good Practice Guide to Maintain Motor Efficiency

Based on the 2019 and 2003 Rewind Studies of premium efficiency, energy efficient, and IE2 (formerly EF1) motors

Good Practice Guide to Maintain Motor EfficiencyThe purpose of this guide is to provide repair/rewind practices and tips that will help service center technicians and motor winders maintain or increase the efficiency, reliability and quality of the motors they repair.

Some of the included procedures derive directly from the 2019 and 2003 rewind studies by EASA and AEMT of the impact of repair/rewinding on motor efficiency. Others are based on the findings of an earlier AEMT study [1998] of small/ medium size three-phase induction motors and well-established industry good practices . 

The procedures in this guide cover all three-phase, random-wound induction motors. Much of the guide also applies to form-wound stators of similar sizes. 

(Note: This guide provides many specific procedures and recommendations. Alternative practices may accomplish the same results but must be verified.)

Download a FREE PDF using the link below or buy printed copies in EASA's Online Store

 

Table of Contents Overview

  • Terminology
  • Energy losses in induction motors
  • Motor repair processes
    • Preliminary inspection
    • Dismantiling the motor
    • Removing the old winding and cleaning the core
    • Rewinding the motor
    • Reassembling the motor
    • Confirming the integrity of the repair
WARNING: HAZARDOUS AREA MOTORS
Some elements of this Good Practice Guide To Maintain Motor Efficiency, particularly those concerning changes to windings, do not apply to hazardous area/explosion-proof motors (e.g., UL, CSA, IECEx). Do not use this guide for those types of motors.

Documents to download

Hazard Communication Manual

Hazard Communication Manual

This indispensable, FREE, 93-page manual was developed to help EASA service centers navigate the difficult terrain of the Federal OSHA Hazard Communication Standard. More specifically, it will help you collect and file Material Safety Data Sheets, train your employees, and document your training as required. Included are a summary of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard, a compliance checklist, a suggested hazard communication program, hints on how to develop a written training program, and a primer on how to read Material Safety Data Sheets. The manual also contains a glossary and samples of various OSHA forms and letters.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction to Hazard Communication
    • Why was this standard put into effect?
    • How will this be done?
    • What should we be doing?
    • How can EASA service centers get this done?
    • Suppose we choose not to do anything?
    • Where can I get further information?
  • Section I: Summary Outline
    • Hazard communication
    • Hazard communication compliance checklist
  • Section II: Suggested Written Program
  • Section III: Hints on Developing Written Training
  • Section IV: How To Read & Understand MSDSs
  • Section V: MSDS Glossary
  • Section VI: Attachments
    • OSHA (Standard 1910.1200)
    • Checmical hazard communication
    • Voluntary training guidelines
    • Substance survey
    • Letters to manufacturers & suppliers
    • Letter re MSDSs to Seller
    • Followup letter re MSDSs to Seller
    • Chemical substance training record

Healthcare Savings Accounts

Healthcare Savings Accounts

Tim Hayes
Contributing Writer
PA Manufacturer Magazine

The first thing most people associate with the Medicare Modernization Act is the prescription drug benefit for seniors, but another provision in that legislation is proving to be more popular and easier to understand and use – Healthcare Savings Accounts, or HSAs.

Under an HSA, interest-bearing tax-free accounts can be opened by anyone who purchases a low-premium, high-deductible insurance policy. The insurance policy itself covers unseen medical catastrophes. Meanwhile, the money put into the HSA account can be used for routine health expenses – from contact lenses to office visits – with un­used savings accruing from year to year.

HSAs put healthcare choices back into the hands of consumers. What’s more, they’re designed to lower the cost of insurance for many Ameri­cans who otherwise could not afford medical coverage. The basic idea is to give individuals a tax break while deregulating the market for health insurance.

How Has the Economic Downturn Altered Liquidity Options for Business Owners?

How Has the Economic Downturn Altered Liquidity Options for Business Owners?

Craig MacKay & Glenn Tofil
England & Company, LLC

Prior to the downturn, many business owners were looking to raise capital for internal growth initiatives, acquisitions, or to buy out a family member or partner, while others were considering an outright sale to an outside acquirer, management or employees. While the current economic slowdown may have delayed those plans, this presentation is designed to help business owners understand: 

  1. Current private capital markets conditions
  2. Alternative transaction structures available to middle market business owners
  3. How financial and strategic investors and acquirers have changed their outlooks given the economic dislocation caused by social distancing measures

Despite the economic downturn, there is an abundance of private capital and continuing long-term interest from financial and strategic acquirers in quality businesses. As part of this session, England & Co. will ask a panel of non-control and control investors and acquirers along with a well-known ESOP attorney to explain key aspects of their particular transaction focus and provide their views on how the current downturn is likely to impact overall levels of transaction activity.

How to Test and Assess Stator Core Condition Using a Loop Test

How to Test and Assess Stator Core Condition Using a Loop Test

Toshiba - webinar sponsor badgePresented by Carlos Ramirez
EASA Technical Support Specialist

Is the motor drawing high no-load amps and winding data are correct? Are you experiencing unusual heating of the stator under load? Those common questions can be answered by checking the stator core condition. This presentation will discuss how to perform a stator core test using a loop test. It also will explain how to analyze the results, providing information about the associated equipment, tips for repairing core damage and explain other alternatives for stator core testing.

The presentation covers:

  • Loop test theory
  • Testing procedure
  • Acceptable limits for losses and core temperatures
  • Associated equipment
  • Tips for repairing core damage
  • Alternative stator core test

This presentation will be useful for supervisors, winders and test technicians.

How Up-Thrust Occurs in Vertical Turbine Pumps and Provisions to Control It

How Up-Thrust Occurs in Vertical Turbine Pumps and Provisions to Control It

Up-thrust can occur during shutdown or when the pump is operating at flow rates greater than the allowable operating range.

Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

Vertical turbine pumps depend on the vertical motor's thrust bearings to support the combined weight of the pump rotor and the motor rotor and to counteract the dynamic down-thrust that the pump impellers generate in lifting the liquid.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

IECEx - Explosive Atmospheres

IECEx - Explosive Atmospheres

The IECEx is a global certification scheme based on standards of the International Electrotechnical Commission. It caters for differing countries whose national standards are either identical to those of the IEC or else very close to IEC standards.

The IECEx is truly global in concept and practice, reduces trade barriers caused by different conformity assessment criteria in various countries, and helps industry to open up new markets. The goal is to help manufacturers reduce costs and time while developing and maintaining uniform product evaluation to protect users against products that are not in line with the required level of safety.

As many countries have their own national standards and certification schemes, the movement of Ex equipment between countries is often impeded by the need to re-certify or re-test regardless of previous assessments, which adds to the final cost.Time is wasted by mostly formal, not technical approval procedures, which delays final market access. The aim of the IECEx is to ease international trade of Ex equipment by eliminating the need for duplication of testing and certification. It is a voluntary scheme that provides an internationally accepted means of proving that products have been:

  • Independently tested; and
  • Produced under strict quality controls audited and under surveillance by an independent IECEx Certification Body.

All this to ensure product compliance with IEC standards.

Important Considerations for Accommodating Pump Repair in Your Service Center

Important Considerations for Accommodating Pump Repair in Your Service Center

Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

It happens to just about every EASA service center. A machine shows up for repair; it has leads, and there’s a motor, but the machine is a pump. Most often, it’s a close-coupled pump or a submersible pump. If your response is, “We don’t work on those here,” because you’re thinking, “We don’t know anything about repairing pumps,” you may be turning your back on some very profitable work.

As I detailed in my February Currents article, pump repair can be a very profitable expansion area for service centers that specialize in electric motor repair only. If you agree that pump repair would be a good fit for your business, the next step is to evaluate what changes your facility needs to accommodate repairing pumps. You will find that you have much of the necessary equipment from repairing electric motors. The mechanical characteristics of motors and centrifugal pumps are very similar. Depending on the type of pump, there may be very little additional that you need.

Increased traffic to easa.com helps promote awareness

Increased traffic to easa.com helps promote awareness

Kevin Krupp 
York Repair, Inc. 

As most of you know, EASA recently completely redesigned its Web site at easa.com. This was done to add many new features, including a whole new“look,”improvedmem­ber search capabilities, an online discussion forum, easy-to-use calen­dar, expanded member and chapter listings, archives, and the ability for authorized company representatives to view contact information. 

Industry Awareness: More than publication of articles

Industry Awareness: More than publication of articles

Campaign efforts also include industry representation, presentations

George Flolo
The Flolo Corp.
Bensenville (Chicago), Illinois
Chair, Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee

One of the items discussed at the Marketing & Industry Awareness Com­mittee meeting held September 27 in St. Louis was the continuing success of EASA’s Industry Awareness Campaign. 

A goal of the campaign is to get EASA staff-authored technical articles in the trade press. And we continue to do very well in that area. That success is measured in the number of media “impressions.”  

Since October 1, 2007, more than 1,639,000 media impressions related to EASA appeared in the trade and local media.  

Invest in Developing Leaders to Ensure Ongoing Success

Invest in Developing Leaders to Ensure Ongoing Success

Tim Hebert
Management Services Committee Member
A&W Electric, Inc.

As leaders, we are responsible for developing those around us to maximize their performance and prepare them for larger roles within our organizations. This facet of management presents several challenges, not the least of which is a shortage of experienced technicians. While we have mostly focused on filling technical positions, we can make a similar case for acquiring management, sales and support talent.

Job Descriptions for EASA Service Centers

Job Descriptions for EASA Service Centers

Written job descriptions can be tremendously helpful in making your operations run more smoothly, especially since employees are usually more productive when they know exactly what is expected of them. EASA’s publication, Job Descriptions For EASA Service Centers, provides a starting point for members who wish to write or revise job descriptions for their individual repair centers.

Job descriptions for service center personnel:

  • Service center manager
  • Rewind department supervisor
  • Rewind department assistant supervisor
  • Motor rewind technician
  • Motor rewind helper
  • Mechanical department supervisor
  • Motor mechanic assistant supervisor
  • Motor mechanic
  • Machine department supervisor
  • Industrial electronics manager
  • Industrial electronics technician

Job descriptions for office/sales personnel

  • Accounting supervisor/Full-charge bookkeeper
  • General accounting clerk/General bookkeeper
  • Cost accounting clerk
  • Information technology (IT) manager
  • Systems operator/Data entry clerk
  • Estimator/Customer service
  • Purchasing agent
  • Receptionist
  • Truck driver
  • Sales manager
  • Inside sales representative
  • Outside sales representative

La Opción para la Reparación de Bombas en los Centros de Servicio

La Opción para la Reparación de Bombas en los Centros de Servicio

Gene Vogel
Especialista de Bombas & Vibraciones de EASA

Cuando EASA adoptó el eslogan “The Electro-Mechanical Authority,” esto fue mucho más que una acción superficial. Mientras el negocio de la reparación de motores eléctricos es una actividad que genera valor para la gran mayoría de centros de servicio asociados a EASA, las máquinas rotativas de todo tipo son un segmento importante del negocio de la reparación y de la rentabilidad general de los centros de servicio. Junto con los motores eléctricos, las bombas roto-dinámicas (bombas centrífugas y de flujo axial) son la categoría más grande de máquinas reparadas en los centros de servicio adscritos a EASA. Las razones para la expansión en el segmento de la reparación de bombas son evidentemente claras: 

  • Las bombas son máquinas costosas y normalmente no son fabricadas en dimensiones convencionales. Los motores eléctricos NEMA e IEC fabricados en serie, son máquinas básicas y varían muy poco entre un fabricante y otro. Pero las bombas están mucho menos estandarizadas. No existen carcasas estándar para dos de las bombas más comunes: Las sumergibles y del tipo turbina vertical. 
  • En muchas aplicaciones, el corazón de la bomba, el impulsor (impeller) se mecaniza a una medida especial para que trabaje en una aplicación específica. Los repuestos requieren un tiempo de entrega prolongado, haciendo que la reparación sea una opción mucho más viable.  
  • En tiempos de recesión económica, los principales segmentos de aplicaciones de bombas son seguros. El agua municipal, las aguas residuales y el control de inundaciones tienen una financiación y demanda estables. 

Los centros de servicio miembros de EASA que buscan expandirse o que estén interesados en reemplazar los mercados de reparación volátiles existentes, han visto en la reparación de las bombas algo idóneo. Por lo general, la mayoría de los mismos repara bombas roto-dinámicas. Por mucho, las bombas son la categoría más grande de máquinas accionadas por motores eléctricos.

Si un centro de servicio está reparando motores eléctricos, entonces es casi seguro que algunos de estos motores estén accionando bombas y que con sus clientes actuales existan perspectivas para reparar las bombas.

Leadership: Good Leader, Bad Leader

Leadership: Good Leader, Bad Leader

Clint Swindall,
Verbalocity, Inc., San Antonio, TX

Leaders often lead employees based on the way they’ve been led in the past. As leaders, we can all think of good bosses and bad bosses from our past. Good or bad, there were lessons to be learned. In this 15-minute session, the speaker discusses what makes bad leaders bad and good leaders good, with an eye on person introspection of our own leadership abilities.

Leadership: Leading the Change

Leadership: Leading the Change

Clint Swindall
Verbalocity, Inc.

The pandemic of 2020 is creating change in virtually all organizations. From changes in work routines to uncertainty of security in the future, employees are faced with change (both professionally and personally). In this 15-minute recording, the speaker addresses a very specific thing you can do to help employees through these changing times.

Leadership: Playing the Proper Role

Leadership: Playing the Proper Role

Clint Swindall
Verbalocity, Inc.

As a professional, you are contributing to your organization with exceptional skills required for your area of expertise. As a leader, you are contributing based on your ability to successfully fill four specific roles of leadership. In this 15-minute recording, the speaker takes a look at those four roles and how to fill the right role for each leadership situation.

Leading Through Crisis

Leading Through Crisis

Practical, Powerful Help to Increase Sales Management Effectiveness NOW

Mike WeinbergIn this new webinar created specifically for owners, general managers and sales leaders, highly rated 2019 EASA speaker Mike Weinberg shares strong words of encouragement, practical coaching tips, and powerful best practices for leading (sales teams) through this unique time.

This session covers:

  • Critical Characteristics for Leading Through Crisis
  • Balancing Empathy & Accountability
  • Remaining On-Mission: The Duty of Sales
  • Success Stories from Sellers
  • Choosing Perseverance & Positivity over Pity Parties & Panic
  • Fly. The. Airplane. – Focusing Exclusively on Fundamentals
    • 1:1 Accountability for Results, Pipeline & Activity
    • Sales Team Meetings that Energize & Equip Salespeople
    • Addressing Underperformance & Complacency
    • Pointing the Team
    • Arming the Team

Mike's passion is helping sales teams win more New Sales!

He's become one of the most trusted and sought after sales experts and has led workshops and consulted on five continents in the past year. Mike is the author of three Amazon #1 Bestsellers: #SalesTruth, New Sales. Simplified., and Sales Management. Simplified. which is the most reviewed sales management book on Amazon and been called "arguably the best book ever written on sales management." Inc. Magazine also heaped praise on his work, saying that it’s “the #1 book every sales leader should read.”

Legal & HR Factors to Survive COVID-19

Legal & HR Factors to Survive COVID-19

Are you aware of the federal employment law related to COVID-19 that could impact your business? This EASA-exclusive webinar will make sure you are in compliance!

If your company was granted a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan, do you know all the parameters for making sure the loan is forgiven? View this webinar recording to be sure!

Presented by expert attorney and consultant David Schein, MBA, JD and PhD, President and General Counsel of Claremont Management Group. David has been a highly-rated and well-received speaker at past EASA conventions.

Let's Get Organized: Reduce Waste & Optimize Productivity

Let's Get Organized: Reduce Waste & Optimize Productivity

Mike Howell
EASA Technical Support Specialist

This presentation focuses on helping service centers get organized using the "5S" pillars. 5S is an effective methodology used to reduce waste and optimize productivity through maintaining an orderly workplace and using visual indicators to achieve more consistent results. Successful implementation frees up wasted space and reduces excess inventory and unplanned downtime.

The 5S pillar or phases are:

  • Sorting
  • Straightening
  • Shining
  • Standardization
  • Sustaining

Several simple simulation activities will amplify the benefits of implementing these approaches.

Leveraging Marketing Automation

Leveraging Marketing Automation

Justin Hatfield
Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee Member
HECO - All Systems Go
Kalamazoo, Michigan

Do you ever wonder to yourself, "How do all of these people have this much time to be on social media?"

So many businesses, even in our industry, post content weekly, daily or hourly. In addition to this, they send out regular email blasts, have a blog or purchase advertisements online. 

How do they have the time to get it all done? Do they have a team of marketing people doing all of this for them?

Likely not.

For the vast majority of people in our industry involved in online marketing, the answer isn't a large marketing staff, but a tool called marketing automation.

Link Up with LinkedIn

Link Up with LinkedIn

Crystal Bristow
EASA Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee Member
Jenkins Electric Co.

Of all the social media options, look to LinkedIn to build your online presence within the electromechanical industry. It’s professional, requires less engagement than traditional social media and is used the most by our industry.

To make the most of the platform, review your profile and check for a few must-haves (or use this as a starting point):

  • Upload a profile picture. It should be professional (selfies, boat pics or pictures with alcohol are no-go’s). Don’t worry about going to a photo studio. Ask a coworker with a smartphone snap a picture of you outside in natural lighting with a clean background.
  • Check that your job title, location and company are current.
  • Write an “about” statement highlighting your career accomplishments, certifications and expertise. Think of this as your “personal elevator speech.”
  • List your current and previous positions and add a summary to each (just a few short sentences about your role and responsibilities).
  • Next, start exploring, connecting and engaging.

Give LinkedIn five minutes a couple of times a week, and see industry peers and relevant trends show up in your feed. And, of course, follow EASA for updates and valuable content. 

 

Making Shaft Lift Adjustments in Vertical Turbine Pumps

Making Shaft Lift Adjustments in Vertical Turbine Pumps

Best practices for safe operation and easy accessibility.

Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

Vertical turbine pumps (VTP) commonly have rotors with multiple mixed-flow impellers (sometimes 12 or more) that are supported by a vertical pump motor. Such designs offer a lift adjustment for raising or lowering the pump rotor to properly position the impellers within the bowl. Depending on the type of pump, this may be critical for maximizing pump efficiency and could have a significant impact on motor load (current) and reliability. Given the importance of VTP lift adjustments, it is necessary to recognize that procedures vary with the characteristics of the pump and motor.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Management Pulse survey results focus on safety analysis and work instructions

Management Pulse survey results focus on safety analysis and work instructions

Tom Barnes
Compliance Specialists, Inc.

In the most recent Management Pulse survey, members were asked to respond to questions regarding the use of work instructions and job safety analysis.

Management Pulse survey results: Accounting Information Systems

Management Pulse survey results: Accounting Information Systems

Steve Rossiter
Energy Management Corp.

Like some of you old timers, I started my business with an accounting system consisting of columnar ledger sheets. Each evening I would take a pencil and enter all of the sales in one column, costs in another and expenses in another. I hoped I had made a profit and that my accountant could make sense of it all come tax time. We have come a long way since those days where computers and sophisticated ERP (enterprise resource planning) software is now common. There is a trend to develop real-time connection and data extraction in all aspects of our business from the shop floor to the bank.

The first “Management Pulse” survey provides insights that can help members identify accounting system trends and benchmark their business based on data provided directly from EASA membership.

Management Pulse survey results: Corporate compliance, performance and disciplinary actions

Management Pulse survey results: Corporate compliance, performance and disciplinary actions

Janet Schmidlkofer
K&N Electric Motors, Inc.

Thanks to all who took a few moments to respond to our most recent Management Pulse survey on corporate compliance, performance and disciplinary actions. I imagine this is a topic that does not reside at the top of the “What am I going to work on today?” list. Unfortunately, to make matters worse, you may never experience the need to prove you have a program. Of course that is the good news. I will quickly review the results from the 146 survey respondents and then share a few thoughts and ideas.

Management Pulse survey results: Creative ways to provide "employee perks"

Management Pulse survey results: Creative ways to provide "employee perks"

Jimmie Williams, Jr.
Bardleys', Inc.

This is the eighth in a series of “Management Pulse” articles written by members of your Management Services Committee. The “Pulse” program strives to bring useful information to managers and owners to prepare them for the daily struggles in our industry. The committee has developed the “Pulse” surveys to gather data from member participants to help get a flavor for what our industry is currently doing in several areas. The articles summarize the findings from these surveys.

Management Pulse survey results: Customer credit and payment options

Management Pulse survey results: Customer credit and payment options

Jimmie Williams, Jr.
Bradleys', Inc.

Cash flow is the heartbeat of every successful service business. Balancing the ebb and flow between Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable is a struggle, especially when the customers do not pay within the negotiated term. If a company’s credit requirements are too stringent, we may lose good customers. If too lenient, we are left holding an empty money bag. We’ve all been burned at least once by a publicly traded corporation due to their financial failure. Of the 188 respondents to the recent Management Pulse survey on customer credit applications, 85% extend credit terms to their customers.

Management Pulse survey results: Employee drug testing policies in the workplace

Management Pulse survey results: Employee drug testing policies in the workplace

Tom Barnes
Compliance Specialists, Inc.

Can you remember the day when running an EASA business was about just repairing and selling motors, pumps, and other similar types of electromechanical equipment? 

Those were the times when you didn’t have to worry about being sued by a herd of lawyers trying to take a chunk of your business. Well, times have changed.

Each and every one of us knows how a drug or alcohol impaired employee will not only be a danger to themselves and others, but how they can affect quality, production, and a host of other issues. 

Several years ago, owners and managers found that a solution to help minimize this from occurring was to have a fair drug testing policy. This testing could include pre-employment, post-accident, for cause, random testing, or a combination of all or some of these. These drug testing policies were put in place to deter on-the-job drug and alcohol use and from this writer’s perspective, it works.

Management Pulse survey results: Employee training

Management Pulse survey results: Employee training

Syndy Thrash
Evans Enterprises, Inc.

You’ve probably heard the adage that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. Well, if you’ve ever had a dog, you know that with careful training, that’s not always true.

Along the same lines, those of us in the electromechanical repair industry have probably heard an employee or coworker say:  “We’ve always done it that way. If it works, why change?”  Here, too, with the proper training, most of the time we can learn a better, more efficient way do something that we’ve always done.

The latest “Management Pulse” survey on employee training provides valuable information on the resources, time devoted to and emphasis on training reported by those who participated in the survey.

Management Pulse survey results: Employees, company image, project management and templates

Management Pulse survey results: Employees, company image, project management and templates

Lenwood Ireland
Ireland Electric Co.
 
It seems that in the management of people, there is often the need for a new form or an additional process to protect our most important asset: people. The first three questions of February’s “Management Pulse” survey dealt with this topic.

Management Pulse survey results: Focus on sexual harassment in the workplace

Management Pulse survey results: Focus on sexual harassment in the workplace

Stan Martindell
Topeka Electric Motor Repair, Inc.

In 2017, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recovered $46.3 million for workers alleging sexual harassment. With the rise of the #MeToo movement, this number is likely to keep increasing. It is imperative that employers are informed on what sexual harassment is, who may be liable for harassment, and policies and procedures that are in place or should be in place to help prevent and to report sexual harassment.

Management Pulse survey results: Healthcare and other benefits

Management Pulse survey results: Healthcare and other benefits

Martha Meza-Lara
Bellwood Electric Motors, Inc.

The most important asset to any company is its people. Keeping employees happy in the workplace can make your company a stronger and unwavering force within our industry. To employ a good work force, we must be competitive with the best employers. We should not let “great” candidates slip away without considering all the available incentives that may convince them to come to work for us — and stay.  With these incentives, we create the best atmosphere for employee retention. What incentives do your fellow EASAs have? Do these go beyond just the standard benefits? And how do does your company compare?

Management Pulse survey results: Healthcare costs

Management Pulse survey results: Healthcare costs

Syndy Thrash
Evans Enterprises, Inc.

In recent years, the cost of providing healthcare has skyrocketed for most companies. These significantly increased costs have caused financial pain and hardships for their employees as well.

The latest Management Pulse survey examines what EASA service center owners report as they and their employees deal with the increasing costs of healthcare.

Management Pulse survey results: Replacing management personnel

Management Pulse survey results: Replacing management personnel

Charles Bailey
Kentucky Service Company, Inc.

From time to time it is necessary, through retirements, reductions, or people just moving on, to replace management personnel. Management personnel are from the foreman level all the way up the management line. The process of identifying replacement personnel can be daunting to say the least. Where do we find suitable candidates? If we do not have a suitable candidate within our organization, where do we go?

Management Pulse survey results: Return to Work programs and procedures

Management Pulse survey results: Return to Work programs and procedures

Back in the “good ol’ days,” running a motor service center involved simply repairing and rewinding motors and pumps, and doing so in such a manner as to minimize the likelihood of an employee getting injured while doing so.  Even 10 years ago when we heard of things like DART, TRI, or LWD rates, we would just kind of stare at those people and wonder what kind of foreign language they were speaking. Never in our wildest dreams would we ever anticipate that an employee getting a couple of stitches, or just a prescription for eye drops, could potentially prevent us from obtaining work from our customers in the future. It is unfortunate that this is the world we work in today.  Having lost work time injuries, or just recordable injuries, can potentially exclude you from future work with many of your current customers.

The second “Management Pulse” survey provides insights that can help members identify how other EASA service centers are utilizing “Return to Work” programs and managing injuries at their facilities to help keep these rates as low as possible. The information provided below is based on data provided directly from EASA members.

Of the 150 EASA members who responded to the Return to Work Survey:

  • 52% reported that they had job descriptions developed for each position.
  • 83% said they provided light duty work for employees who are injured at work and cleared for light duty work by the physician.
  • 23% of the respondents currently have a written return to work procedure.
  • 31% have actually communicated the return to work program to their Workers’ Compensation medical provider.
  • 55% of the respondents currently accompany an injured employee to the medical provider.

The benefits of providing light duty work to employees who are injured at work have been well documented. Having an employee return to work at the earliest possible time is not only good for the company, but it has been proven to be the best course of action for the injured employee. Having a documented program, communicating the availability of light duty work to your medical provider, and accompanying injured employees are all methods to help you in managing the injuries and the associated injury rates at your facility.

For further information about Return to Work Programs and proper management of your injured employees, consult with your Workers’ Compensation program providers.  Networking with fellow EASA members often also provides valuable information.

Management Pulse survey results: Sales compensation and strategy

Management Pulse survey results: Sales compensation and strategy

Mike Huber
American MTS

You may have heard the saying that goes: “In business, nothing happens until somebody sells something.” Just about every aspect of a company’s operations revolve around the sales process.

Many growing companies in our industry have someone, whether it’s the owner or others, out meeting prospective customers and regularly selling products and services. The most recent Management Pulse Survey on sales compensation and strategy looks at how some EASA members manage this role how these individuals are compensated.

Management Pulse Survey Results: Talent Acquisition & Retention

Management Pulse Survey Results: Talent Acquisition & Retention

Ryan Senter
Management Services Committee Member
Hibbs Electromechanical, Inc.

As we continue through 2020, talent acquisition and retention remain significant topics in a variety of industries. Based on the results from the recent Management Pulse Survey, 72 percent of respondents, who are fellow EASA members, stated talent acquisition is a significant issue for their companies.

Management Pulse Survey: Employee Engagement Strategies Lead to Employee Satisfaction

Management Pulse Survey: Employee Engagement Strategies Lead to Employee Satisfaction

Tim Hebert
Management Services Committee Member 
A&W Electric, Inc.

Many research organizations study employee engagement, and they should! Employee engagement is one of the most effective ways to keep your team productive. Include them in solving daily problems and capitalizing on opportunities that present themselves in your business.

Gallup reported that approximately 70 percent of employees do not feel actively engaged in their jobs. That is a staggering number. Studies suggest this generally results from a lack of:

  • Communication from supervisors; 
  • Clear expectations or definition of success; 
  • Satisfaction from their work; 
  • Empathy from their management team.  

Whether true or not, that is what many people feel.

Management Pulse: Talent Acquisition & Retention

Management Pulse: Talent Acquisition & Retention

Ryan Senter
Management Services Committee Member
Hibbs Electro-Mechanical, Inc.
Madisonville, Kentucky

No matter how you receive your business news, talent acquisition and retention remain a consistent topic across all professions. Record low unemployment may be cause to celebrate in some respects but can create a very challenging and competitive environment for new talent. Additionally, retirements both necessitate finding new team members and expose the exponentially widening skills and experience gap.

Our industry is no different and may even be at a more considerable disadvantage due to the specialized qualifications necessary for traditional electromechanical equipment repair. 

So, how are we going to solve the problem?

Managing Short-Term Liquidity Needs During an Economic Downturn

Managing Short-Term Liquidity Needs During an Economic Downturn

Craig MacKay & Glenn Tofil
England & Company, LLC

Solid middle-market businesses are vulnerable to revenue surprises and market volatility as the impact of COVID-19 on the economy is currently demonstrating. While the long-term prospects of your business may not be materially impaired by temporary decreases in customer demand, delayed projects or supply chain disruptions, the earnings impact can potentially trigger a default under performance-linked financial covenants with a lender.

As part of this presentation, the speakers discuss: 

  • Steps business owners should take if the breach of a financial covenant is a possibility  
  • The range of how different lenders might work with borrowers that are in default
  • Actions that can be taken if a breach leads to the need to amend an existing credit facility, seek a new credit facility or lending relationship, or possibly raising additional third-party junior capital to shore up a company’s balance sheet

The presenters have helped numerous business owners obtain long-term funding to allow their companies to thrive and grow. In addition, England & Co. will be joined by representatives of leading debt capital providers to discuss how companies can best handle short-term liquidity challenges and prepare for a resumption of long-term growth.

Marketing ANSI/EASA AR100 = TRUST

Marketing ANSI/EASA AR100 = TRUST

Jerry Gray
Sloan Electromechanical Service & Sales

Before getting underway with this marketing discussion, you may be asking:  Why should I even care about the Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus (ANSI/EASA AR100-2015)? Actually, that’s a good question!  

The best place to start with answering this is to go to EASA’s website at easa.com and look up the “EASA Code of Business Practices”. Take a look at Item #3 that reads:  “A member will strive to adhere to all of the standards adopted by EASA.”  

If you’re a good EASA member and show pride in following the “EASA Code of Business Practices,” the “light switch” in your brain may have just switched on!  The ANSI/EASA AR100 is a STANDARD adopted by the Association. It’s a great feeling to know that by following ANSI/EASA AR100 in your service center processes, your staff has been doing the right thing all the time! Whew! You can see now that you know about and really do CARE about ANSI/EASA AR100!!

The next question
Now, here’s the next question:  WHY is there an ANSI/EASA AR100 standard? Part of the answer is given in the first sentence of the standard: “The purpose of this document is to establish recommended practices in each step of the rotating electrical apparatus rewinding and rebuilding processes.”

The other more serious consequential elements of the answer are to: 

  1. Establish TRUST with potential customers;
  2. Reinforce TRUST with previous customers;
  3. And, most importantly, giving TRUST to the service center staff as acknowledgement of their ongoing training and skills, and knowing the services that they are required to perform are recommended practices.  Following these recommended practices proves competence in attaining a quality result.

EASA members are in a highly technical business with potentially life altering consequences as a result of a member-rendered service. Whether it’s putting a flooded pump station rapidly back online for temporary service until a more permanent repair can be performed or getting a production line back into operation so those employees can earn a paycheck, a customer supervisor retains his employment by selecting a trusted EASA member. By being part of a response team to a country’s nuclear disaster, which was the case in Fukushima, Japan, EASA members are given the opportunity to prove TRUST. (Likewise, the EASA member’s failure to prove TRUST diminishes the EASA organization and every EASA member.)

Building on trust
This leads into one of the goals of marketing the standard, and that is sending the message of TRUST. The foundation for any positive relationship is TRUST. Regardless of any product or service being offered, the TRUST message must be sincere and emotionally transparent to create a sales opportunity. 

Educating the customer and service center staff on ANSI/EASA AR100, providing leadership by implementing the recommended practices and furnishing the required equipment create the building blocks of TRUST for everyone.

The presence of TRUST leads naturally into the other goal of marketing: to create a sales opportunity.  

Note that there is really no such thing as an “existing customer.” There is only a previous customer who has become a POTENTIAL customer. A customer only exists during a sales transaction. When a sales transaction is completed, what was a customer now becomes a potential customer. Thus the marketing process repeats, starting with TRUST, in an endless loop to create more sales opportunities.

With a lack of Trust comes an absence of sales opportunities which ceases business growth – leading to an almost certain business decline. This means that marketing becomes a vital part of the EASA member’s business operation and marketing ANSI/EASA AR100 is a critical component of the marketing effort. 

Market standard to build trust
Creating TRUST means marketing ANSI/EASA AR100. How would ANSI/EASA AR100 be marketed to build TRUST for the sales opportunity? This is the easy part:

  1. Have copies of the standard on your sales and service counters.
  2. When visiting a customer, show the standard and explain the processes.
  3. Explain to the customer where the standard can be downloaded on EASA’s website. Or better yet, leave a printed copy for your customer.
  4. The last marketing step is in the final service product being delivered to the customer. The result is a reliable, efficient motor that performs as designed and lasts as long as originally designed – or longer.  

By completing these steps in marketing ANSI/EASA AR100, the goal of TRUST is immensely easier, leading to a sales opportunity with a POTENTIAL customer. Then business gets better!!

Documents to download

Marketing Tip: Claim Your Free Real Estate on Google!

Marketing Tip: Claim Your Free Real Estate on Google!

Kelley Fujino
Marketing + Industry Awareness Committee Member
Lubbock Electric Co.

Have you created your “Google My Business” profile?  It’s free advertising! Even if you haven’t, your company may already have a bare-bones profile created with public information. 

Google My Business (GMB) profiles appear to the right of search results in a separate box for direct company searches and in map results for general searches, such as “electric motor repair near me.”  

Do a Google search for your company name and city to see if your business has one. If you see a link that says “Own this business?” or “Claim this business,” it means that your business page is unclaimed. You can start the process of claiming it from that link. You can also go to google.com/business to either create or claim a business page. 

A Google account is required to create and maintain a GMB profile. Even if you have a personal Google account, consider creating a separate Google account for your business.  After verification, you can easily update the business information, upload attractive pictures, and post articles from your website or special offers.  What’s more, you can track how many calls and website visits your business receives directly from Google and uncover what search terms people used to find your business.

Marketing Tip: Test Your Brand Quarterly

Marketing Tip: Test Your Brand Quarterly

At least once a quarter, spend a few minutes investigating your company as if you were a new customer. Remember, all your sales and marketing efforts must be backed up when customers hit your door, phone or website; otherwise your efforts are wasted.

  • Visit your website with fresh eyes. Do all the links work? Are the phone number, address and hours of operation correct? Is it easy and clear to contact you?
  • Check your contact form (if your website has one). When a form is completed, do you know where it goes? Does your internal staff treat these leads with the importance they deserve?
  • Call your company’s main number and/or 800# from an unknown number. How is the experience? Does someone answer who is pleasant and ready to help?

Follow-up directly with a few new customers every quarter upon the completion of their first job. Have a quick list of questions to gauge their satisfaction level and willingness to repeat business.

Misunderstanding the expense structure

Misunderstanding the expense structure

Dr. Albert D. Bates
President, Profit Planning Group
Boulder, Colorado.

The sales challenges associated with the recession have caused most firms to take a serious look at their operating expenses. Obviously, most of the effort has focused on cutting ex­penses. While that is an important task, a more fundamental issue is determin­ing the nature of the firm’s expense structure. That is, deciding whether the organization should build a heavy fixed-expense structure or whether it should rely more on variable expenses. 

Examining the expense structure is not an academic issue. The ability to put in place an expense profile that reflects the firm’s strategic posture is essential to long-term success. It also has major impli­cations for the ability of the firm to withstand current and future economic challenges.

Mito o Realidad: Conceptos Errados Comunes Sobre Motores Eléctricos

Mito o Realidad: Conceptos Errados Comunes Sobre Motores Eléctricos

Tom Bishop, P.E.
Especialista Sénior de Soporte Técnico de EASA

Un viejo dicho dice: “Si está en blanco y negro debe estar bien”. Ver algo por escrito lo hace más creíble que si se escucha verbalmente. Sin embargo, eso no significa que sea verdad. Siempre deberíamos buscar una justificación que soporte un testimonio, sea escrito o verbal.

Un dicho más reciente dice: “Si está en internet debe ser cierto”. Aplique el mismo concepto aquí. Busque una justificación antes de aceptar información obtenida por internet. Aquí tenemos una colección de algunos de los conceptos errados más comunes acerca de las características de desempeño de los motores eléctricos tipo jaula.

Motor Cleaning Methods and Selection Factors

Motor Cleaning Methods and Selection Factors

Tom Bishop, P.E.
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

Cleaning of electric motor parts is performed in every electrical apparatus service center. This begs the question of whether or not cleaning is being done productively and with minimal safety and environmental consequences.

This webinar recording addresses some of the more common conventional methods of electric motor cleaning and some alternative methods, including:

  • Methods
    • Solvent
    • Aqueous (water-based)
    • Other more aggressive methods
  • Selection factors
    • Size and quantity of parts to be cleaned
    • Type of part, e.g., stators, rotors, housings
    • Type of cleaning agent: solvent or aqueous
  • Environmental and safety concerns

This webinar recording will benefit service center managers, supervisors and technicians.

Motor protection and control tips, procedures

Motor protection and control tips, procedures

Richard Hughes (deceased)
Pump & Motor Works, Inc.

This series of four articles covers many schemes of motor protection and control.

Topics covered include:

  • Time delay fuses
    • Fuse selection
    • Over-current protection
    • Avoiding fuse overloads
  • Circuit breakers
    • Inputs to electronic protection relays
    • Feeding, protecting a motor starter
    • Common features
  • Motor starters
    • How motor starters operate
    • Light, medium or heavy duty
    • Momentary start button
    • Wye series start, parralel run
    • Variety of controls
  • IEEE and ANSI power system device numbers
  • Dashpot type overload relay
  • Thermal overload relay
  • Current transformer
  • Compact relays
  • Restoring balanced voltage
  • Transient voltages
  • Surge capacitor, surge arrestor

Motor Shipping 101

Motor Shipping 101

Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

It’s easy to assume that shipping an electric motor is as simple as putting it on a truck, but nothing could be further from the truth. This article will cover shipping tips and reinforce the fact that shipping includes picking up the motor – not just delivering it. There are some things we (or a trucking company) can do wrong that could result in expensive repairs.

Motor starting capabilities and considerations

Motor starting capabilities and considerations

Tom Bishop. P.E. 
EASA Technical Support Specialist 

It should not be assumed that because a motor can drive a running load, it also has the capability to accelerate the load up to rated speed. During starting, a mo­tor must deliver the energy required to accelerate the load. To do this, the motor torque must exceed that needed to ac­celerate the load. The motor torque value in excess of the load torque requirement is termed the “torque available for ac­celeration,” as shown in Figure 1. 

Though this explanation appears to be relatively simple and straightfor­ward, there are some complex condi­tions. Namely, that the motor torque during starting is not constant, and unless the load is a pure inertia load (very rare), it does not have a constant speed-torque relationship. Therefore, the torque available for acceleration is the difference between the speed-torque curves for the motor and the load. 

No-load current basics: Practical guidelines for assessment

No-load current basics: Practical guidelines for assessment

Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

How much no-load current should I expect when testing a motor? We would like to have a ratio of no-load amps / full-load amps, for quality control purposes. Many of us expect a motor to draw approximately one-third of rated current, when operating from rated voltage on our test panel. That is a good rule of thumb - most of the time. While there are lots of exceptions, most of them are predictable.

The intent of this article is to explain why those statements are valid and, in the process, to offer practical guidelines for assessing no-load current. Many of us apply these principles daily. 
Knowledge is power. We should, whenever possible, improve our knowledge by gathering facts: 

  • Use the AC Motor Verification & Redesign Program to check densities before rewinding the motor. 
  • Keep records of tests for comparison of identical machines. 
  • Get information from the manufacturer to supplement your records.

Topics covered in this article include:

  • Practical guidelines
  • Effects of applied voltage
  • Different designs affect rule
  • Flux and air gap
  • Number of poles
  • Considering scale, manufacturing tolerances
  • Exceptions to every rule

OSHA issues new accident and fatality reporting rules

OSHA issues new accident and fatality reporting rules

Tom Barnes
Compliance Specialists, Inc.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued new accident reporting rules that go into effect on January 1, 2015. These rules cover what type of incidents must be reported to OSHA and in what timeframe.  First, here are a few items to keep in mind:

  1. Employers with 10 or fewer employees are partially exempt from some OSHA recordkeeping requirements such as OSHA 300 recordkeeping.  These facilities are, however, required to report fatalities and injuries. 
  2. This is a federal mandate and, at this time, only affects the 28 states under federal OSHA jurisdiction.  If you are in a state with a state OSHA enforcement agency, you will need to check with them to see if they are adopting the new regulations. OSHA is strongly encouraging all state plans to adopt the new rules.

OSHA: Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19

OSHA: Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) developed this COVID-19 planning guidance based on traditional infection prevention and industrial hygiene practices. It focuses on the need for employers to implement engineering, administrative, and work practice controls and personal protective equipment (PPE), as well as considerations for doing so.

This guidance is intended for planning purposes. Employers and workers should use this planning guidance to help identify risk levels in workplace settings and to determine any appropriate control measures to implement. Additional guidance may be needed as COVID-19 outbreak conditions change, including as new information about the virus, its transmission, and impacts, becomes available.

To reduce the impact of COVID-19 outbreak conditions on businesses, workers, customers, and the public, it is important for all employers to be prepared. For employers who have already planned for influenza pandemics, planning for COVID-19 may involve updating plans to address the specific exposure risks, sources of exposure, routes of transmission, and other unique characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 (i.e., compared to pandemic influenza viruses). Employers who have not prepared for pandemic events should prepare themselves and their workers as far in advance as possible of potentially worsening outbreak conditions. Lack of continuity planning can result in a cascade of failures as employers attempt to address challenges of COVID-19 with insufficient resources and workers who might not be adequately trained for jobs they may have to perform under pandemic conditions.

This booklet covers:

  • Information about COVID-19
  • How a COVID-19 outbreak could affect workplaces
  • Steps all employers can take to reduce workers' risk of exposure
  • Classifying worker exposure to SARS-CoV-2
  • Jobs classified at lower, medium and higer exposure risks and what to do to protect workers
  • Workers living abroad or travelling internationally
  • OSHA assistance, services and programs
  • OSHA regional offices
  • How to contact OSHA

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides the latest information about COVID-19 and the global outbreak:

CDC.GOV

The OSHA COVID-19 webpage offers information specifically for workers and employers:

OSHA

 

This guidance is advisory in nature and informational in content. It is not a standard or a regulation, and it neither creates new legal obligations nor alters existing obligations created by OSHA standards or the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act).

DOWNLOAD THE BOOKLET BELOW

Documents to download

Payment Methods: Benefits and Risks

Payment Methods: Benefits and Risks

Lessons Learned from EASA Members

Paul K. Graser, CFE
Senior Investigative Specialist
Edward Jones

Merchants (sellers) have a decision to make when they set up their business regarding accepted forms of payment. All methods come with risks, but the goal is to mitigate that risk so it is easy to conduct business with customers (buyers).

Credit cards are convenient, but the merchant pays a fee to accept them (typically between 1.5 and 4.0 percent per transaction). Checks can also be convenient for the buyer, but the merchant runs the risk of the bank returning the check due to forgery or insufficient funds.  

The merchant assumes the risk and can pay a heavy price for offering the convenient payment options. Many small businesses play the role of both customer (buyer) and merchant (seller).  
Some of your fellow EASA members shared cautionary tales regarding experiences with various payment methods and their respective risks.

Plant maintenance practices: Which tasks might be outsourced?

Plant maintenance practices: Which tasks might be outsourced?

Jerry Peerbolte
J. Peerbolte & Associates
Fort Smith, Arkansas

EASA’s 2014 research that focused on members’ customers included several questions to identify key opportunities and trends relating to the outsourcing of maintenance tasks.  Overall, the trend lines continue to show more maintenance outsourcing in the future.  See Chart 1 for the broad topic of preventive and predictive maintenance. 

For preventive maintenance efforts, we learned that about a quarter of the end users surveyed outsource these tasks. The numbers look even better for EASAns when end users were asked about predictive maintenance practices. Here, about 40% of end user customers reported outsourcing some or all of these efforts. When asked spe­cifically about future outsourcing plans – 17% reported plans to shift more preventive maintenance to outside contractors, and an even greater 26% suggested shifting more predictive maintenance to outside contractors.

Plant maintenance strategies provide opportunities for EASAns

Plant maintenance strategies provide opportunities for EASAns

Jerry Peerbolte
J. Peerbolte & Associates
Fort Smith, Arkansas

How do most plant maintenance personnel characterize their overall maintenance strategy for the electric motors operating in their facility? EASA posed this question in the 2014 end-user customer research project. The most common response (42%) was “reactive maintenance.” Another 30% described their strategy as “preventive maintenance” defined as “performed primarily following a prescribed pro­gram.” Another 20% characterized theirs as a “predictive maintenance” strategy that is one “performed pursu­ant to a monitored/condition-based criterion.” 

EASAns may assist customers in following any of these strategies. How­ever, some important insights came from a series of follow-up questions that tried to identify future trends in these strategies and any corresponding outsourcing opportunities.  

Power factor correction: Why it is important

Power factor correction: Why it is important

Richard Huber, P.E.
Richard Huber Engineering, Ltd.

In large office buildings or industrial settings, the power factor should be maintained close to unity. The benefits in doing so are as follows: The losses in the cables and other equipment can be reduced because the current flow through them is reduced. This, in turn, reduces heating, and hence aging. In addition, the requirements for circuit interrupting devices are less onerous. So smaller or less expensive ones can be used. Finally, energy costs can be reduced by eliminating or reducing utility surcharges. Note that not all utilities penalize the user for low power factor.

Practical problem solving for the entire service center

Practical problem solving for the entire service center

Mike Howell
EASA Technical Support Specialist

This presentation focuses on a report format developed by Toyota for a simple, yet methodical approach to document improvement. Whether you're dealing with problems related to sales, purchasing, repair or testing, if all team members can learn to speak the same, simple problem-solving language, they can tackle problems efficiently and effectively.

Target audience: This presentation is best suited for executives, managers, team leaders and front line supervisors from the office and service center who want to understand and implement such a program.

Preparing Your Business for a Financing or Sale

Preparing Your Business for a Financing or Sale

Techniques for Maximizing the Value (and Minimizing the Risk) created Through a Transaction

Craig MacKay & Glenn Tofil
England & Company, LLC

Raising capital or selling a business is time consuming and requires significant preparation well before the first potential financing partner or acquirer is contacted. This session will provide attendees with: 

  1. An understanding of how to best prepare your business to fully explore your options while minimizing the distraction from running the business
  2. An overview of a “typical” transaction timeline
  3. Techniques for maximizing the value created through a transaction
  4. An outline of key economic and legal terms that can often leave a business owner exposed to significant unexpected liabilities following the close of a transaction

Moderated by England & Company, this presentation includes a panel of leading control and non-control investors and a corporate securities attorney that have many years of experience in dealing with business sales and acquisitions. This experience will be helpful as the presenters share insights and observations regarding the larger, non-financial questions owners must ask themselves as they prepare to transition or finance their businesses.

Principles of Medium & Large AC Motors, 1st Edition - IEC

Principles of Medium & Large AC Motors, 1st Edition - IEC

This version of Principles of Medium & Large AC Motors manual is now available to address applicable IEC standards and practices. This 360-page manual was developed by industry experts in Europe along with EASA's engineering team. (The "original" version of this book based on NEMA standards remains available as a separate document.)

This manual includes drawings, photos and extensive text and documentation on AC motors, including how they work, information on enclosures, construction on components and applications. Many of the principles included apply to all AC motors, especially those with accessories that are associated with larger machines in the past (such as encoders, RTDs, thermostats, space heaters and vibration sensors).

While the manual covers horizontal and vertical squirrel-cage induction motors in the 37 to 3,700 kW (300 to 5,000 hp) range, low- and medium-voltage, most of the principles covered apply to other sizes as well. 

This valuable instructional/resource manual is available in printed and downloadable versions, and focuses primarily on IEC motors.

Sections in the manual include:
(Download the PDF below for the complete Tables of Contents)

  • Motor nomenclature & definitions
  • Motor enclosures
  • Typical motor applications
  • Safety & handling considerations
  • Basic motor theory
  • Motor standards
  • Stators
  • Squirrel cage rotors
  • Shafts
  • Bearings & lubrication
  • Motor accessories & terminal boxes
  • Test & inspection procedures
  • Motor alignment, vibration & noise
  • Storage procedures
  • Synchronous machines

BUY A COPY FOR YOUR OFFICE

PRINTED BOOK DOWNLOADABLE PDF

This book is also available focusing on NEMA Standards — in both English and Español.

NEMA - English NEMA - Español

Documents to download

Problem solvers: Our service technicians are also our salesmen

Problem solvers: Our service technicians are also our salesmen

James Smith
Advanced Electric Service, Inc.

I believe most EASAns would agree that the competitive advantage we have over others is our technical expertise. It’s what separates us from some of the big power transmission (P.T.) houses and Internet sales com­panies. I know I’m the greatest service to my customers when they let me use my experience to solve their specific problems.

I used to have a hard time decid­ing on how to dress for sales calls. Twenty-five years ago, business casual really didn’t exist. My choices were either a suit and tie or my uniform. I found out then and continue to believe today that I’m most effective as an outside salesman when I dress as a technician. If I were to dress in something too “formal,” my custom­ers wouldn’t let me go to the places where I can help them the most (places that are good and dirty).

Procedimientos y Precauciones al Convertir Cojinetes de Deslizamiento a Rodamientos de Bolas/Rodillos

Procedimientos y Precauciones al Convertir Cojinetes de Deslizamiento a Rodamientos de Bolas/Rodillos

Chuck Yung
Especialista Sénior de Soporte Técnico de EASA

Existen ocasiones en las que una aplicación requiere que un motor soporte una carga radial para la que los cojinetes de deslizamiento no son adecuados. En casos como bajas revoluciones, carcasas inusuales, etc., puede ser conveniente convertir el motor del cliente montado sobre cojinetes de deslizamiento envés de obtener un motor de repuesto con rodamientos de bolas / rodillos. Este artículo contiene procedimientos sugeridos y advertencias sobre problemas potenciales relacionados con dichas conversiones.

Primero, inspeccione las tapas del motor para asegurarse de que tengan la rigidez mecánica suficiente para soportar la carga y suprimir la vibración (vea la Figura 1). Si las tapas carecen de rigidez, puede que sea necesario utilizar tapas nuevas fabricadas con un material más grueso. En otros casos, se puede utilizar un inserto para reforzar la tapa existente.

Prueba de Condensadores para Motores Eléctricos

Prueba de Condensadores para Motores Eléctricos

Tom Bishop, P.E.
Especialista Sénior de Soporte Técnico de EASA

En este artículo discutiremos las pruebas de los condensadores usados en los motores eléctricos en general, así como también las pruebas asociadas al uso específico de condensadores empleados para la corrección del factor de potencia y en el arranque de los motores eléctricos (Ver Figuras 1 y 2). Para obtener información de como calcular la capacidad de los condensadores para corrección del factor de potencia y en un motor eléctrico, consulte las Subsecciones 2.10 y 2.11 del Manual Técnico de EASA.

Pump Reliability Essentials

Pump Reliability Essentials

Presented by Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

The EASA Pump Reliability Seminar is a two-day program that describes in detail the factors related to pump reliability. This webinar introduces participants to those factors and how they come together to ensure a reliably operating pump. Not everyone needs to be a pump expert, but they should know the essentials of reliability to recognize when more expertise is needed.

  • Pump reliability factors
  • Pump applications
  • Pump failure modes

This top-level view will be useful to service center managers, sales personnel, engineers and technicians who encounter pumps in the scope of their work.

Pump Repairs and Procedures

Pump Repairs and Procedures

8
presentations
$40
for EASA members

 

A special discounted collection of 8 webinar recordings focusing on various aspects of pump repair.

Once purchased, all 8 recordings will be available on your "Downloadable products purchased" page in your online account.

Downloadable recordings in this bundle include:

Troubleshooting Pump Performance Problems
Presented May 2017

This presentation covers:

  • Not enough pressure (head) or not enough flow – how do you respond?
  • How to determine if a pump is operating properly
  • Differentiating a pump problem from a system problem
  • Determining pump load and power requirements
  • The effect of fluid parameters and cavitation on pump performance. 

Target audience: This will be most useful for service center technicians and engineers. The content will also be beneficial for supervisors and managers who are responsible for pump failure analysis and testing. 


Pump Failure Case Study
Presented December 2013

This presentation covers:

  • Brief overview of disassembly and evidence of failure
  • Discussion of possible failure scenarios
  • Review of actual repairs, modification and reassembly
  • Update of machine's present operation

Repair Tips for Submersible Pumps
Presented February 2013

This presentation focuses on:

  • Types of submersible pumps
  • Tips on seal arrangements
  • Common repair procedures
  • Cables and cable entries
  • Testing submersibles in the service center

Assessing Impeller Damage
Presented May 2019

The impeller is generally the most difficult pump component to repair and the most expensive to replace. This session will look at case histories of failed pumps and the steps to determine the cause of failure. Topics covered include:

  • Erosion, corrosion, cavitation or wear: What happened to this impeller?
  • How to spot the tell-tale signs
  • What operational conditions led to impeller damage

Repairing Impeller Damage
Presented May 2016

We’ve covered how to assess impeller damage. Now learn how to fix that damage. This presentation covers: 

  • Replacing/repairing wear rings
  • Repairing cavitation damage
  • Impeller replacement options
  • Dynamic balancing impellers

Techniques for Straightening Pump Shafts
Presented March 2011

The slender dimensions of many pump shafts make them susceptible to distortion, which affects pump performance and reliability. This recording presents a methodical approach and effective techniques for measuring and correcting shafts which are bent or twisted.

Target audience: This presentation is intended for service center supervisors, managers and machine shop technicians.


Vertical Turbine Pump Repair Tips
Presented February 2012

Vertical turbine pumps are used extensively in every segment of industry. Although they are not complex, repairing them in the service center can present a few challenges. This presentation gives some approaches and procedures that experience has shown will make the job easier.


Final Testing for Pumps - An Overview
Presented November 2014

The pump repairs are completed! Now the pump needs to be tested. This presentation discusses the procedures for the basic tests that can be performed on pumps that have been repaired in the service center.

Final testing of pumps can include:

  • Operational tests
  • Seal leakage test
  • Motor chamber leakage test (submersibles)
  • Casing pressure test

While some of these tests are not difficult to perform, knowing the methods and limits will help service centers to confidently deliver quality pump repairs.

Pump Theory and Application

Pump Theory and Application

7
presentations
$35
for EASA members

 

A special discounted collection of 7 webinar recordings focusing on pump design thoery and how to determine is a pump is appropriate for an application.

Once purchased, all 7 recordings will be available on your "Downloadable products purchased" page in your online account.

Downloadable recordings in this bundle include:

Quick Pump Curves: How to Read Them
Presented July 2011

This presentation takes the mystery out of pump curves and provides viewers with the necessary knowledge to determine pump operating points, efficiency and horsepower. The exclusive parameters that determine if a pump is likely to cavitate are also discussed.

Target audience: This presentation is intended for application engineers, sales personnel, managers and interested pump technicians and supervisors.


The Basics: What Every Repairer Needs to Know About Pump Curves
Presented August 2016

This presentation covers:

  • Head & flow = volts & amps for pumps
  • Testing pumps to their performance curves
  • Troubleshooting pump performance
  • What the pump curve tells you about cavitation 

The Basics: What You Should Know About Pump Cavitation
Presented December 2016

This presentation covers: 

  • What is classic pump cavitation?
  • The NPSHA – NPSHR relationship
  • How to identify the evidence of cavitation
  • Other types of cavitation

Using Variable-Speed Drives to Improve Pump System Efficiency
Presented May 2018

This presentation discusses:

  • Potential savings for pump operations
  • How service centers can profit
  • Identifying system benefits

Target audience: This webinar will benefit service center technicians and supervisors.


Pump Seals — Advanced
Presented February 2012

This presentation focuses on:

  • A review of seal basics
  • Seal materials for primary and secondary seals
  • How to determine spring tension values
  • How to calculate PV values
  • Seal flush plans

Vertical Turbine Pump Shaft Journal Bearing Material, Types and Clearances
Presented December 2017

The rules of thumb often applied to journal bearings in horizontal machines don’t apply to vertical machines. Vertical turbine pumps are a common example. This presentation explains the characteristics of bearings in these pumps and provide examples of manufacturers specifications. In addition, specialty bearing materials will be discussed in regard to applications, specifications and installation.

Target audience: This webinar is most useful for service center technicians and engineers. The content is beneficial for supervisors and managers who are responsible for pump failure analysis and testing.


Vertical Turbine Pump Shaft and Bearing Types, Fits and Clearance
Presented November 2018

This presentation covers:

  • Shaft material and specs
  • Shaft coupling types
  • Machining for shafts
  • Bronze, plastic, graphite and cutlass bearing options
  • Bearing clearance concerns and reference data 
  • Bearing housing fits

Target audience: This webinar will benefit service center technicians and supervisors.

Repair or Replace? Research reveals criteria end users consider

Repair or Replace? Research reveals criteria end users consider

Jerry Peerbolte
J. Peerbolte & Associates
Fort Smith, Arkansas

How do end users make repair or replace decisions for failed electric motors?  This question was explored in EASA’s 2014 end-user customer research study. It was also examined in the earlier 2003 and 2008 research projects providing the opportunity to determine if attitudes and practices have changed over time.

In the most recent study, half of the end users surveyed reported a policy of automatically replacing motors un­der a specified horsepower rating. The specific rating ranged from as low as 1 hp to over 200 hp, with the median rating of 10 hp.  

Report on EASA Activity with IECEx Technical Committees: Part 2

Report on EASA Activity with IECEx Technical Committees: Part 2

John Allen
Representing EASA on IECEx Committees
Sheppard Engineering Ltd.
Solihull, United Kingdom

Part One of This Report Appeared in the June 2020 Issue of Currents.

October: TC 31 Meetings in Nanyang, China
Working Group (WG) 27 held a two-day meeting and reviewed comments from committee members on IEC 60079-7 (Ex “e”). The latest draft of IEC 60079-0 and its Annexes were reviewed. Since IEC 60079-14, selection, design and erection of fixed electrical installation was ongoing, the committee proposed the inclusion of an Annex relating to EMC and safety related aspects of converter installations.  

Sales Force Compensation Manual

Sales Force Compensation Manual

Not that many years ago, all that was necessary to start a “Mom & Pop” motor repair shop was to hang a sign over the door and put a listing in the phone book. “Mom & Pop” soon found themselves working nights and weekends. But of all the problems they had, having to “sell” was not one of them.

Oh, for the good old days of abundant and profitable repair business. Unfortunately, such days are gone. For those of us in the electrical apparatus sales and repair business today, having to “sell” has become the most important challenge we face—whether we realize it or not.

The reasons are clear. Markets for both new motors and motor repairs are getting smaller, not larger. At the same time, the number of businesses attempting to serve these shrinking markets is growing. In such a business climate, only the companies that do the best job of “selling” will survive. Even an otherwise well managed company will eventually have to “fold its tent” if it does not do an effective job of “selling” in today’s market.

Many EASA members recognize the challenge, and some already have begun placing greater emphasis on selling in their business plans. But we suspect that the vast majority do not at present have an employee specifically assigned to carry on afull-time, outside sales program. We further suspect that the primary reason for this is that they feel they can’t “afford” it. They see such a person as “non-billable overhead,” and hence a drain on what precious little profit they are able to generate

Granted, many member firms are small. But no matter what their size, few would consider not paying their electric billbecause it is “non-billable overhead.” They regard the availability of electricity as an absolute necessity to operate their busi-ness. In today’s marketplace, the same can be said of a sales program, and of the salesperson needed to carry it out.

A salesperson should not be viewed as a luxury affordable to only the big companies, but as a necessity for every EASA member who wishes to survive in the future. The right salesperson, properly compensated, is an investment even the smallest member firm can ill-afford not to make.

Sales management transformation: Customer Relationship Management (CRM) process implementation and training

Sales management transformation: Customer Relationship Management (CRM) process implementation and training

Richard Bashore
Reading Electric

Background
In early 2002, my company em­barked upon a program of business development tactics to increase sales & profitability in our core businesses, and to assist our team in investigating new markets. This program formed the basis of our Customer Relationship Manage­ment (CRM) process.  By definition, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is the strategic and tactical processes of proactive management of customer relationships. 

I felt it was necessary to take a dif­ferent approach for several reasons. One of our major business segments (Telecom) was contracting. Our current approach to developing new sales op­portunities had become too reactivate and passive; relying too much on past successes which was translating into “waiting for the phone to ring.” Couple this with a declining customer base due to our area’s manufacturing base relocating out of the region, and our sales growth was stagnating.  

Sales Strategies to Enact During a Pandemic

Sales Strategies to Enact During a Pandemic

Kevin Femal
Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee Member
EMS Industrial, Inc.

The life of a sales professional is one that few will ever understand unless they've stepped into the batter's box themselves. It is a life on the road attempting to put out fires, controlling the uncontrollable and building deep relationships while hunting for new opportunities. Structurally, things have changed as “on the road” has taken a different meaning over the last several months. Yet, through all the twists and turns, there are plenty of reasons to be optimistic.

Whether you have a dedicated sales team or that responsibility falls to you, consider integrating these lessons from 2020 to your 2021 sales strategy.

Sales Truth

Sales Truth

The Truth About Creating More Sales Opportunities, and The Truth About Why We Get Commoditized (and what to do about it!)

Mike Weinberg
Speaker, Consultant, Best-Selling Author

The title says it all!! Last year’s highly rated speaker on sales is back by popular demand.

Select Presentations 2015

Select Presentations 2015

If you weren't able attend the 2015 EASA Convention, you can still benefit from all the great the education.

Besides convention papers and handouts, the 2015 “Select Presentations” on USB flash drive includes audio recordings of most sessions with synchronized slide presentations. Copies of the session handouts are included, and some session also provide additional technical papers.

Papers and/or slide presentations included are:

Technical Presentations

  • Connections for Winding & Starting* – Jim Bryan
  • Pump Reliability Issues – Gene Vogel
  • Implementing the EASA Accreditation Program* – Tom Bishop, P.E.
  • Minimizing Calibration Costs for Measuring and Test Equipment* – Mike Howell
  • Shaft Alignment: Rock ‘N’ Roll Machinery Style* – Gene Vogel
  • The Effect of Structural Support Conditions on the Vibration Characteristics of Machinery* – Robert Sayer
  • The Effects of Voltage and Frequency Variations on Motor Performance* – Austin Bonnett
  • Time- & Money-Saving Devices for the Service Center* – Chuck Yung

Management Presentations

  • Industrial Economy 2015 to 2017: Regional & Global – Brian Beaulieu
  • Safety Regulations Update & EASA Helps Build Your Safety Program – Tom Barnes
  • Avoiding Problems When Hiring and Firing – David Schein
  • EASA Service Center Accreditation Program Update – Art Anderson
  • European & World Trends, Techniques and More – Mathis Menzel, David Griffin, Johan De Coster and Frederic Beghain
  • Handling Common Employment Policies Correctly – David Schein
  • Are We Still Friends? Key Insights in the Global Motor Manufacturer’s View of EASA Members – Jerry Peerbolte

Sales/Marketing Presentations

  • Book Camp: Social Media for Industrial Business – Eddie Bluff and Brian Bluff
  • Technology to Generate Leads and Increase Sales – Eddie Bluff and Brian Bluff
  • Are You Managing a ‘Selling SWAT Team’ or Independent Gunfighters? – Jim Pancero
  • How to Survive – and Master – a Sales Call – Jim Pancero

* Includes additional paper

Cost

  • Members: $119
  • Non-members: $357

Note: Select Presentations is one of many benefits of registering for EASA Conventions. A copy is distributed FREE to all Full Business, Education & Exhibits, and Weekend Package registrants.

System requirements
Adobe Reader 9 or later, USB port, web browser and audio output for recording playback.

Select Presentations 2016

Select Presentations 2016

Preview - 2016 Select Presentations

If you weren't able attend the 2016 EASA Convention, you can still benefit from all the great the education.

Besides convention papers and handouts, the 2016 “Select Presentations” on USB flash drive includes audio recordings of most sessions with synchronized slide presentations. Copies of the session handouts are included, and some session also provide additional technical papers.

If you were able to attend the 2016 Convention and purchased a Full Business, Education and Exhibits, or Weekend Package, you were sent a FREE copy! A great bonus to make your convention experience last long into the future! 

Papers and/or slide presentations included are:

Technical Presentations

  • Pumping System Optimization – Bill Livoti
  • Stator Core Testing:  Know What You Have Before You Wind It* – Mike Howell 
  • How Winding Changes Affect Motor Performance* – Tom Bishop, P.E.
  • Pump Cavitation Case Study* – Gene Vogel
  • Hybrid Permanent Magnet Motors:  Repair and Application Considerations* – Rich Schaefer
  • DC Theory and Design 101* – Chuck Yung
  • Failure Analysis of Bearings* – William Frabell 
  • Steel – Metallurgy and Practical Application of Various Grades of Steel* – Gene Vogel
  • Speed/Torque Curves* – Jim Bryan

Management Presentations

  • EASA Service Centers and Regulatory Inspections – Tom Barnes
  • Regulatory Changes and Top Ten Safety Issues Facing the Service Center – Tom Barnes
  • Global Industrial Economy 2016 and Beyond – Brian Beaulieu
  • Practical Steps to Transition Your Business – Tom Deans
  • Getting Your Business Ready for Sale – Tom Deans
  • European Trends, Repair Industry Development and Industry 4.0 – Frederic Beghain, Johan De Coster, Dirk De Nutte, David Griffin, Mathis Menzel
  • Offering Comprehensive Motor Management Programs* – Chris Culver

Sales/Marketing Presentations

  • Enhancing Profit in EASA Service Centers – Joe Patterson
  • How Customers Evaluate the Quality of Your Service Work – Jerry Peerbolte
  • Introducing New Services:  Are Customers Interested? – Jerry Peerbolte
  • Vital Planning Regiments for Sales Professionals:  Parts 1 and 2 – Don Buttrey
  • Sustainable Sales Team Development:  Parts 1 and 2 – Don Buttrey

* Includes additional technical paper

Cost
Members: $119
Nonmembers: $357
Note: Select Presentations is one of many benefits of registering for EASA Conventions. A copy is distributed FREE to all Full Business, Education & Exhibits, and Weekend Package registrants.

System requirements
Adobe Reader 9 or later, USB port, web browser and audio output for recording playback.

AEGIS corporate logo
Sponsored by AEGIS, dba Electro Static Technology-An ITW Co.

 

Select Presentations 2017

Select Presentations 2017

Preview - 2017 Select Presentations

Besides convention papers and handouts, the 2017 Select Presentations USB flash drive includes audio recordings of most sessions with synchronized slide presentations where applicable.

Sessions included on the USB drive are:

Technical Presentations

  • Using Variable-Speed Drives to Improve Pump System Efficiency* – Gene Vogel
  • AC Motor Basics – Mike Howell
  • Pump Mechanical Seals* – Gene Vogel
  • Isolation Test Bed Design and Construction* – Gene Vogel
  • Little Things That Make a Big Difference in a Service Center* – Chuck Yung
  • Requirements to Service Hazardous Location Motors* – Jim Bryan
  • Emerging Technologies in the Motor Industry* – Tom Bishop, P.E.
  • Is It the Drive or the Motor?* – Craig Hartman
  • How and Why to Avoid Using Counterfeit Bearings* – Antun Peakovic
  • Induction Motor Rotor Windings* – Mike Howell
  • Field Service Work, Techniques and Cautions* – Chuck Yung
  • Basic Drive Parameters and How They Affect the Motor/Drive Combination* – Craig Hartman

Management Presentations

  • Employee Benefits Options: Be Creative – Tonya Thompson
  • European Trends, Repair Industry Development – Frederic Beghain, Johan De Coster, David Griffin, Mathis Menzel
  • Why Management Has to be Different in Today’s Times – Tonya Thompson
  • The Industrial Internet of Things – What Does It Mean to You? – Chris Wiseman
  • Regulatory Changes and Top Safety Issues – Tom Barnes
  • Industry Research: EASA Service Center Trends and Future – Michael Marks and Jerry Peerbolte
  • Economic Trends 2017 and Beyond – Brian Beaulieu

Sales/Marketing Presentations

  • Sell First; Negotiate Second – Mark Hunter
  • High-Profit Prospecting: Breakthrough Results Require Break.through Strategies (Parts 1 & 2) – Mark Hunter
  • Sales Compensation Strategies – Michael Marks
  • What is the Right Sales Force Structure for Your Company? – Michael Marks

Includes technical paper

NOTE:
The USB Flash Drive has been mailed free of charge to Full Business registrants who attended the 2017 EASA Convention in Tampa.

AEGIS corporate logo
Sponsored by AEGIS, dba Electro Static Technology-An ITW Co.

 

Select Presentations 2018

Select Presentations 2018

Preview - Select Presentations 2018

Besides convention papers and handouts, the 2018 Select Presentations USB flash drive includes audio recordings of most sessions with synchronized slide presentations where applicable. A complete list of all 2018 exhibiting companies and their contact information is also included.

NOTE:
The USB Flash Drive has been mailed free of charge to Full Business registrants who attended the 2018 EASA Convention in Milwaukee. Copies have also been mailed to anyone that purchased a copy on site.



Sessions included on the USB drive are:

Technical Presentations

  • How the ISO 21940-11 Balance Quality Grade Standard Impacts Service Center Balancing* – Gene Vogel
  • Introduction to Problem Solving and Root Cause Failure Analysis –  Mike Howell
  • Overview of the New Shaft Alignment Standard* –  Gene Vogel
  • Pump Curves and Affinity Laws – in Laymen’s Terms* –  Gene Vogel
  • Air Gap: What Is It, What Does It Do and Why Is It Important?* –  Chuck Yung
  • Understanding the Interactions of Pumps, Motors and Drives* –  ​Bill Livoti
  • Insulation Technology Improvements and the Repair Market* –  Mike Howell
  • Theory and Application of Static Partial Discharge Detection* –  ​Jimmy Coombs
  • Selecting Replacement DC and 3-Phase Squirrel Cage Motors* –  ​Tom Bishop, P.E.
  • Advanced Rotor Bar Testing with Surface Magnetic Field Measurements* –  ​Scott Clark

Management Presentations

  • Technology, Digitization and the Future of (Technical) Service Business (Parts 1 & 2) –  Titos Anastassacos
  • A Primer on Wage and Hour Laws and Compliance Tips –  David Schein, MBA, JD, PhD.
  • Q&A: Wage and Hour Laws and Compliance –  ​David Schein, MBA, JD, PhD.
  • Top 10 HR Mistakes to Avoid in 2018 – ​David Schein, MBA, JD, PhD.
  • Q&A: Human Resource (HR) Mistakes to Avoid –  ​David Schein, MBA, JD, PhD.
  • The “Ins and Outs” of Selling or Buying an EASA Business –  Clint Bundy, Bill Harlan, Brian Nowak, Mike Rice
  • Member Case Study: Reactive to Proactive Maintenance/Service –  Ashutosh Kumar
  • EASA Industry Research: Deeper into the Data - What Else We Learned –  J. Michael Marks, Jerry Peerbolte
  • The Economy: A Bend in the Road –  Brian Beaulieu

Sales Presentations

  • Fanatical Prospecting: The Ultimate Guide for Staring Sales Conversations and Filling Your Business Pipeline –  Keith Lubner
  • Sales EQ –  Keith Lubner
  • Communicate with Influence (Parts 1 & 2) –  Stacey Hanke
  • Overcoming Sales Objections –  Keith Lubner

*Includes technical paper

AEGIS corporate logo
Sponsored by AEGIS, dba Electro Static Technology-An ITW Co.

 

Selecting Replacement DC and 3-Phase Squirrel Cage Motors

Selecting Replacement DC and 3-Phase Squirrel Cage Motors

Presented by Tom Bishop, P.E.
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

On many occasions, a different motor type is desired or needed. In these cases it is essential that the replacement motor provides the required performance, and do so reliably.

This webinar will focus primarily on the electrical aspects of selecting replacement motors. It also will address speed and torque considerations.

  • DC motor to DC motor
  • DC motor to 3-phase squirrel cage motor
  • AC motor to 3-phase squirrel cage motor

This webinar will benefit anyone selecting replacement motors or diagnosing issues with replacement motor installations.

Sleeve Bearing to Ball / Roller Bearing Conversion Procedures and Cautions

Sleeve Bearing to Ball / Roller Bearing Conversion Procedures and Cautions

Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

There are times when an application calls for a motor to carry a radial load for which sleeve bearings are not suitable. In cases such as low rpm, unusual frames, etc., it may be desirable to convert a customer's existing sleeve bearing motor rather than obtaining a ball/roller replacement motor. This article contains suggested procedures as well as cautions about potential problems with such conversions.  

First, inspect the end brackets to ensure they are mechanically rigid enough to support the load and suppress vibration (see Figure 1). If the end brackets lack rigidity, it may be  necessary to use complete fabricated replacements using thicker material. In other cases, gusseting can be used to stiffen the existing bracket.

Small Business Fraud: Avoiding Common Schemes

Small Business Fraud: Avoiding Common Schemes

How EASA Members Have Fallen Victim

By Paul K. Graser, CFE
Sr. Investigative Specialist
Edward Jones
St. Louis, Missouri

Although fraud does not discriminate, it has a heavier impact on smaller businesses (companies with fewer than 100 employees). Larger businesses have the luxury of implementing more complex procedures and audit controls. They may even set up a fraud hotline for employees to report any internal issues.  

An Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) study in 2018 concluded that 30 percent of fraud cases occurred in small businesses, and 60 percent of those did not recover their losses. Those losses were in addition to the regular things that can affect productivity and profits, such as employee morale, brand image, reputation and unforeseen issues like global pandemics. Fraud in small businesses can have a more damaging effect because of smaller scales and profit margins.  

Social media isn't just for kids - it's for your business, too!

Social media isn't just for kids - it's for your business, too!

By Eddie Bluff & Brian Bluff
Site-Seeker, Inc.

Editor’s Note:  Eddie Bluff was a presenter at the 2013 EASA Convention in Las Vegas. His sessions were titled “Marketing via Your Web Site,” “The Convergence of Search & Social Media,” and “Web Site and Social Media Audits.”

“Social media? You mean like Facebook? My employees get fired if they’re on Facebook at work!”

That’s the usual reaction we get when we present the idea of using social media to business owners, managers, and executives at most industrial-minded firms around the country. Typically, our first-time prospects see social media as:

  • Unsecure
  • Time wasting
  • Frivolous
  • Insignificant

Those objections, all very reasonable at first glance, can be taken apart with just a little examination.

In an attempt to dispel some of the trepidation expressed through these anti-social media objections, the remainder of this article will tackle each head on.

Eddie Bluff is the Vice President of Key Accounts and Co-Founder of Site-Seeker, Inc., an Internet marketing company created by Eddie and his brother, Brian, in 2003. Site-Seeker performs the efforts necessary to drive qualified visitors to its clients’ Web sites; convert the visitors into buyers; measure the results achieved; and develop improvement plans based on performance.

Brian Bluff is the President and Co-Founder of Site-Seeker, Inc., a Central New York based Internet Marketing Firm that has been recognized as being one of New York’s fastest growing small businesses.

Start new year off right by getting back to basics

Start new year off right by getting back to basics

Cyndi Nyberg Esau
Former EASA Tenchincal Support Specialist

As we move into January, it's time to put into practice those New Year's resolutions we made. Many of us have the same ones every year. You know: eat less, exercise more, spend more time with the family, etc. However, rather than personal challenges, presented here are the"resolutions" for some of the more common calls we receive in the Technical Support Department at EASA Headquarters. A review of the basics is always a good idea to start the new year fresh!

Strive for “lean service” with a focus on the “shine” activity

Strive for “lean service” with a focus on the “shine” activity

Five + 1 S Series

By Dan Custer
Riverside, Inc.

Editor’s Note: This is the third in the “5+1 S Series” of articles written by EASA’s Management Services Committee to provide “lean service” resources to members. The traditional “5S” program covers these goals: sort, straighten, shine, standardize and sustain. We’ve added safety to make it the “5+1 S Series.” 

Last month, Ron Collins, a fellow member of the Management Services Committee, explained the “straighten” activity and how it helps service center personnel work more efficiently. This month I’ll cover the third S: Shine.

Shine activity
The shine activity refers to cleaning that goes beyond standard sweeping of the shop or a quick wipe down of a work bench. It refers to consistent daily cleaning of your work space, tools, equipment and supplies. All of these items should be in the same condition at the end of each day as when the day started.

There are many advantages of the shine activity, not the least of which is a safer work space. There are fewer hazards in a work area that is cleaned on a consistent basis. There are fewer tripping and pinch point hazards and other distractions, which all contribute to a safer work environment.

Strive for “lean service” with a focus on the “sustain” activity

Strive for “lean service” with a focus on the “sustain” activity

Five + 1 S Series

Tom Barnes
Compliance Specialists, Inc.

Editor’s Note: This is the fifth in the “5+1 S Series” of articles written by EASA’s Management Services Committee to provide “lean service” resources to members. The traditional “5S” program covers these goals: sort, straighten, shine, standardize and sustain. We’ve added safety to make it the “5+1 S Series.”

Over the years, how many of you have worked really hard to lose weight? Some have lost 20, 30 or 40 pounds over a 6-12 month period, only to gain it all back – and more – just a few short months later. Why? That’s because they didn’t permanently change their habits or culture.

If you correctly followed the first four “S” activities in this series which covered sort, straighten, shine and standardize, then your facility should look better, be safer, more efficient, produce better quality repairs, achieve improved morale, and so on.

Surviving Today's Financial Challenges

Surviving Today's Financial Challenges

Presented by Al Bates, Ph.D., Distribution Performance Project

Dr. Al Bates, renowned speaker and friend of EASA, reviews the financial challenges you're facing in these complicated times brought on by the pandemic. This program provides a structure you can use to evaluate your own situation and adjust your actions accordingly. Dr. Bates will help identify key mistakes from the past to avoid, suggest an action plan to improve your long-term financial performance and more. Gain valuable insights you need to survive this new climate.

Switched Reluctance Motor Basics

Switched Reluctance Motor Basics

By Mike Howell
EASA Technical Support Specialist

The switched reluctance motor (SRM), also known as the variable reluctance motor (VRM), originated in the mid-1830s. It was first used as a locomotive traction motor. However, the power electronics necessary for satisfactory control of SRMs were not patented until the early 1970s. This entailed electronic commutation synchronized with rotor position. Service centers are seeing an increase in the number of SRMs received for repair, and some of the technicians encountering them are unfamiliar with how they work. As with any other rotating machine, a basic understanding of operating principles can be useful in troubleshooting and repair. One of the most critical things for service center personnel to understand upfront is that these machines cannot be operated without a special drive, which typically would need to be supplied by the end-user or the manufacturer.

Synchronous Reluctance Motor Basics

Synchronous Reluctance Motor Basics

Mike Howell
EASA Technical Support Specialist

Advancement in power electronics over the last few decades has made it possible to utilize a variety of rotating electric machines that would otherwise not be feasible. One such class of machines is called reluctance machines because of the way they produce an electromagnetic torque. A reluctance machine is an electric machine in which torque is produced by the tendency of its movable part to move to a position where the inductance of the excited winding is maximized. A March 2020 Currents article discussed the switched reluctance motor (SRM) while this article will focus on the synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM). Let’s take a look at some of their similarities and differences.

Talent Management: Getting the Right People in the Right Seats

Talent Management: Getting the Right People in the Right Seats

Tim Hebert 
Management Services Committee Member
A&W Electric Inc.

Thought leaders in management provide solid information on developing people. Bottom line: You must find great people and place them in the right roles. My favorite phrase of all: “Right People; Right Seats.” If only it were that simple!

Selecting the right people for the right roles is one of the most important and difficult things we do! When someone fails in a role, it does not mean they have no value to the organization. They may have tremendous value in other positions. As leaders, we must find that unique talent inside each person and help them maximize their potential.

Technical cost-saving tips to improve profit

Technical cost-saving tips to improve profit

Chuck Yung 
EASA Technical Support Specialist 

One of the many enjoyable parts of this job is that I get to see a number of service centers. Dur­ing the course of touring those facilities, I am continually impressed by the innovative ideas people use to improve some aspect of motor re­pair. Writing articles for CURRENTS gives me an opportunity to share your ideas with each other. 

When the economy is tight, as it is now, we can use all the belt-tightening tips we can find. If your profit margin is 5 percent, $10,000 worth of sav­ings has the same impact on the bottom line as $200,000 worth of new business. It is a lot easier to adopt a few money-saving ideas than to pick up an­other account. This article represents ideas gleaned from your EASA brethren. If you find one or two tips you can use to improve your bottom line, well, just thank your fellow EASAns at your next chap­ter or regional meeting. 

Ten quick tips to minimize sexual harassment issues in your workplace

Ten quick tips to minimize sexual harassment issues in your workplace

Editor’s Note: Questions or comments can be directed to Attorney Howe at P.O. Box 4429, Reading, Pennsylvania 19606; or e-mail at ahowe@hhha.com. The information in this article is appli-cable in the U.S. although the principles apply to most companies in general. The article was submitted by Richard Bashore of Reading Electric in Reading, Pennsylvania and member of EASA’s Management Services Committee.

In recent years, a dramatic increase in sexual harassment claims have oc-curred in workplaces across America. One predominant theme out of these cases is the employer’s failure to implement certain basic precautions in their workplace to avoid these claims. Specifically, the courts, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) (the agency enforcing sexual harassment laws at the federal level), repeatedly have warned that employers must take certain basic precautions in order to minimize liability for potential sexual harassment claims. Despite these warnings, an abundance of recent cases show that employers in large measure have ignored or refused such warnings to their detriment. Below is a list of ten tips for your workplace designed to minimize or eliminate sexual harassment problems. Although no one can guarantee the elimination of sexual harass-ment problems or claims asserting such problems, the following tips are helpful in proactively addressing sexual harassment in your workplace:

In recent years, a dramatic increase in sexual harassment claims have occurred in workplaces across America. One predominant theme out of these cases is the employer’s failure to implement certain basic precautions in their workplace to avoid these claims. Specifically, the courts, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) (the agency enforcing sexual harassment laws at the federal level), repeatedly have warned that employers must take certain basic precautions in order to minimize liability for potential sexual harassment claims. Despite these warnings, an abundance of recent cases show that employers in large measure have ignored or refused such warnings to their detriment.

Below is a list of ten tips for your workplace designed to minimize or eliminate sexual harassment problems. Although no one can guarantee the elimination of sexual harassment problems or claims asserting such problems, the following tips are helpful in proactively addressing sexual harassment in your workplace:

  • Create And Implement A Written Sexual Harassment Policy
    This item is the most important primary tool to the reduction or elimination of sexual harassment liability in the workplace. A well-written and disseminated policy is critical to not only preventing sexual harassment but addressing sexual harassment if it occurs in your workplace.
  • Train, Train, Train
    The next most important precautionary tool for sexual harassment in the workplace is thoroughly training all employees regarding sexual harassment in the workplace. This training would include all employees in your workplace, not simply certain categories of employees. Furthermore, the training should involve specific discussion of issues that may arise in the workplace as well as discuss the company’s written policy on sexual harassment.
  • Practice What You Preach
    As a business owner, often times one forgets that he or she is subject to the same policies he or she imposes on the work force. Also, owners lead by example. Thus, it is extremely important that owners of businesses, as well as those with authority over the majority of the work force, adhere to principles against sexual harassment in the workplace, both by word and by deed.
  • Do Not Minimize The Problem
    Often times, when an employee raises an issue regarding potential sexual harassment in the workplace, the immediate reaction is to minimize or dismiss the concern as something other than a legitimate complaint of sexual harassment. It is important not to fall prey to that instinct but instead treat all concerns and/or complaints of sexual harassment by employees very seriously to assure a consistent message is sent to the work force and that any problem is addressed appropriately.
  • Timely Investigate All Complaints
    Recent pronouncements from the United States Supreme Court as well as the EEOC instruct that any complaint of sexual harassment in the workplace be timely and thoroughly investigated. The investigation must not simply be a brief meeting with the accuser but instead must involve interviews with potential witnesses and parties to the purported harassment; written statements from those who may be involved; and follow-up interviews or request for information. A thorough and timely investigation is a significant defense to a later lawsuit against sexual harassment.
  • Appropriately Remedy Any Acts Of Harassment
    If your timely investigation reveals that an act of sexual harassment occurred, then you must take actions designed to eliminate that harassment and prevent that type of harassment occurring again. Implementations of such actions must be done quickly and must involve a reasonable belief that those actions will eliminate the harassment and prevent it from occurring ever again. These actions vary in nature but range from termination of the harasser to implementation of additional training, policy or programs designed to further eliminate harassment.
  • Don’t Forget The Complaining Party
    When a complaint of sexual harassment occurs, it is important that the complaining party not be forgotten in the process. Specifically, if your investigation reveals that harassment occurred, then you should take steps to address any potential harm or concern of the complaining party that resulted from the harassment. Also, when the investigation of the complaint is complete, it is important to notify the complaining party that an investigation occurred; that the investigations was completed; and that some action will or will not be taken at the conclusion of the investigation. The amount of information provided to the complaining party varies dramatically depending on the nature of the harassment and the nature of the conclusions reached in the investigation.
  • Be A Leader, Not A Follower
    When complaints of sexual harassment are made to either the EEOC or filed before a court, one issue that can arise is what “profile” the employer fits with respect to harassment in the workplace. Both the EEOC and juries want to label employers when determining whether harassment occurred and whether the employer should be found liable for such harassment. A company that is seen by the EEOC or a jury as a leader in preventing harassment in the workplace and promoting diversity in the workplace will often times fair much better than an employer who is seen as only acting begrudgingly to implement legal requirements or stop repeated complaints. Therefore, it is important that an employer’s corporate philosophy and actions embrace promoting elimination of harassment in the workplace.
  • Avoid Labels
    When complaints of sexual harassment are made in the workplace, it is easy for employers to immediately attempt to label a complaining party and/or the alleged harasser. As Alice once said in looking through her looking glass, “all is not as it appears to be.” Certainly, that sentiment applies when complaints of sexual harassment are made. It is important to not prejudge or to label those who may be involved in an allegation of harassment but instead to remain neutral and accept all facts and understand all issues before making determinations regarding the parties involved. A misstep in labeling either the complaining party or the harasser can be fatal in a successful defense to a claim.
  • Avoid Retaliation In All Forms
    The law equally protects those who complain about sexual harassment in the workplace from any forms of retaliation. Additionally, these same laws extend protections to those who participate as witnesses or as “support” to a complaining party in a claim of sexual harassment. Retaliation claims are on the rise and are very easy to make. Simply stated, if an employer takes any action that a complaining party or someone who is supporting the complaining party can argue or cause them to not come forward or assist with a claim in the future, then a retaliation claim exists. Recently, the United States Supreme Court has opined on this issue and has established a very broad standard under which employees can bring claims for retaliation. Thus, an employer must take great means to avoid any retaliation against a complaining party and/or one who supports the complaining party in the complaint process.

The above are 10 tips that are designed to insulate an employer from claims of sexual harassment in the workplace as well as eliminate harassment issues in the workplace. Although this article highlights some of the main tips it is not a substitute for understanding all the requirements imposed by the law on this issue. Thus, the readers are strongly encouraged to seek professional advice when addressing these issues.

The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Premium Efficiency/IE3 Motors

The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Premium Efficiency/IE3 Motors

2019 Rewind Study

This valuable publication explains the findings of a major study that analyzed the impact of repair/rewinding on the energy efficiency of Premium Efficiency/IE3 electric motors. This study was a follow up to a 2003 study.

The 2019 study reaffirms the results of the 2003 study.

The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Premium Efficiency/IE3 MotorsAbstract
In response to various opinions about the feasibility of maintaining motor efficiency during repair, including replacement of the stator winding, the Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA) and the Association of Electrical and Mechanical Trades (AEMT) conducted two comprehensive rewind studies using third-party testing laboratories.

The results of the first study, which were published in 2003 (see Part 2 on Page 2-1 of this document), clearly showed that the efficiency of energy efficient and IE2 motors ranging from 7.5 hp to 200 hp (5.5 kW to 150 kW) can be maintained (and sometimes improved) if the stator is rewound using established good practice procedures.

The increasing use of premium efficient motors mandated by various countries led to a second rewind study in 2019, this time to determine if the efficiency of premium efficiency and IE3 motors can be maintained when they are rewound using the good practices described in the 2003 rewind study and ANSI/EASA AR100-2015: Recommended Practice for the Repair of Electrical Apparatus.

As with the 2003 study, the results of the 2019 rewind study that follow clearly show the answer is YES–with the average efficiency change for the entire test group falling within the range of accuracy for the test method (± 0.2%). In several instances, motor efficiency actually improved.

Overview of the Table of Contents

  • Part 1: 2019 Rewind Study–The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Premium Efficiency/IE3 Motors
    • Objective
    • Products evaluated
    • Standards for evaluating losses
    • Third-party testing protocol
    • Results of efficiency tests on rewound motors
    • Conclusion
  • Part 2: 2003 Rewind Study – The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor Efficiency
    • Objectives
    • Products evaluated
    • Standards for evaluating losses
    • Third-party testing protocol
    • IEEE Std. 12B test method: Input - output with loss segregation
    • Core loss testing
    • Results of efficiency tests on rewound motors
    • Significance of test results
    • Conclusion
Download a PDF of the complete study or the Executive Summary
for free using the links below.
Printed copies are also available in EASA's Online Store.

 

Documents to download

The IECEx Certified Service Facilities Program

The IECEx Certified Service Facilities Program

The international Ex community (Ex equipment manufacturers, end users and regulators) have worked hard at providing standardization of technical requirements for Ex equipment and systems now reflected in a mature set of standards; work on standardizing the approaches to testing and certification is relatively young. The benefits of publishing international equipment standards can be overshadowed by the application of different testing and certification practices and systems. This can result in costly re-testing and re-certification as well as lost time-to-market for manufacturers and down time for plant operators.

While Underwriters Laboratories (UL), the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and Equipment and Protective Systems intended for use in Potentially Explosive Atmospheres (ATEX) Directive have been seen as a solution to a converging common approach, the question remains: "What about companies and organizations that operate globally?"

The Impact of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)

The Impact of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)

Justin Hatfield
Ad Hoc Committee on Emerging Technologies Chair
HECO - All Systems Go!

In 2019, the EASA International Board of Directors approved the formation of an Ad Hoc Committee on Emerging Technologies to address the impact of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), Industry 4.0, remote condition monitoring and whatever associated “buzz words” you can think of.

The committee’s purpose is simple: to research IIoT as it applies to the electric motor and rotating apparatus industry and determine what role, if any, EASA should take. The committee also works to determine the best ways to keep members up to date on this topic.

Since then, the committee has regularly met (via Zoom, before it was popular) to discuss various emerging technology topics and trends. Committee members have led presentations and open forums at EASA conventions to help guide members down this developing path.

Over the summer, the committee considered next steps and decided to conduct a survey. We felt this was the best way to get feedback directly from EASA members.

The Pump Repair Option for Service Centers

The Pump Repair Option for Service Centers

Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

When EASA adopted the slogan “The Electro-Mechanical Authority,” it was more than a superficial initiative. While electric motor repair is a core business for the vast majority of EASA service centers, rotating machinery of all types are a significant segment of service centers’ repair business and overall profitability. Next to electric motors, roto-dynamic pumps (centrifugal and axial flow pumps) are the largest single category of machines repaired in EASA service centers. The reasons for the expansion into the pump repair segment are clearly evident:

  • Pumps are expensive machines and are not frequently built to standardized dimensions.Standard NEMA and IEC electric motors arecommodity items with little differentiation between manufacturers. But pumps aremuch less standardized. No standard framesizes exist for two of the most common style pumps – submersible pumps and vertical turbine pumps.
  • In many applications, the heart of the pump,the impeller, is specially trimmed to match that application. Replacement requires longlead time, making repair a much more viable option.
  • Major segments of pump applications aresecure during times of economic recession. Municipal water, wastewater and flood control have stable funding and demand.

EASA service centers looking for options for expansion, or to replace evaporating existing electric motor repair markets, have seen pump repair as a good fit. A majority of EASA service centers currently repair roto-dynamic pumps. Pumps are by far the largest category of machines driven by electric motors. 

If a service center is repairing electric motors, then it is almost certain that some of those motors are driving pumps, and the prospects for pump repair are its existing customers.

The SELL Process: Pre-Call Planning

The SELL Process: Pre-Call Planning

The will to win is not nearly as important as the will to prepare to win! The days of "winging it" are over. Customers want professional sales people who are focused and prepared. Sales interactions in a plant, across a desk, face-to-face and on the phone are where sales are won or lost each day. This presentation discusses:

  • Preparing and executing highly effective, consultative customer interactions
  • Improving call success
  • Standardizing your pre-call planning and customer interaction process

 

The siren song of inventory reductions

The siren song of inventory reductions

Dr. Albert D. Bates
President, Profit Planning Group
Boulder, Colorado 

The downturn in economic activity caught many firms somewhat off guard. As a result of sales challenges, cash suf­ficiency has become a very serious issue. For the typical EASA member, cash now represents only 6.7% of total as­sets. It is a cash position that does not leave a lot of room for error.

To offset the cash chal­lenge, most firms have looked at reducing the “cash traps” in the busi­ness, particularly inventory. While reducing the investment in inventory is a laudable objective, it is fraught with some danger. It is possible, and maybe even likely, that the drive to lower in­vestment levels will trigger further sales declines, through a higher occurrence of out-of-stock situations. 

The true cost of a company's missed sales opportunities

The true cost of a company's missed sales opportunities

Dr. Albert D. Bates
President, Profit Planning Group 
Boulder, Colorado

One of the realities of Management Information Systems (MIS) is that they only express what actually happened. In many instances, it is important to understand the financial and operating impact of what didn’t happen. This is especially important with regard to missed sales opportunities.

Given the severity of the recession, many firms are making some major changes in their operations—lowering payroll, reducing inventory levels and tightening credit policies. Such actions have a very pronounced and very visible impact on financial performance. At the same time, all of these actions have the potential to decrease sales. Nowhere in the MIS is there a proper entry for the economic impact of sales that are not made.

Thoughts (and questions) about whether to bring family into the business

Thoughts (and questions) about whether to bring family into the business

Bill Gray
Control Concepts, Inc.
Houston, Texas
Marketing & Industry Awareness 
Committee Board Coordinator

My business in Houston is now 25 years old. At this time I don’t have any family members involved in it. And so this question has been on my mind lately:  Should I try to recruit family members?  
I started my business in 1984 when my family and I were very young. Thinking back, I have no recollection of my expectations.  I guess I thought I could support my young family better if I worked for myself. I’m sure I was also motivated by ego. It sounds cool to be a business owner. It really sounds cool when you are 27 years old.

Thoughts on recession-proofing your business

Thoughts on recession-proofing your business

Al Bates, Ph.D.
Profit Planning Group

Editor's Note: Part of the information in this article came from the EASA Operating Survey conducted by the Proft Planning Group in 2008.

In the current economic environment, firms are placing much more emphasis on financial integrity than ever before. However, the vast majority of potential actions are ones that should have been taken before a recession hits. It proves almost impossible to strengthen balance sheets, for example, when sales and profits are sliding. In addition, some of the actions taken to strengthen the firm are proving to be counter-productive. For example, enhancing the firm's cash position frequently comes at the expense of profitability. This report will examine the issue of financial integrity. That means the ability to survive an economic downturn with a minimum of pain. The report will also suggest that the lessons of this recession should not be forgotten amidst the euphoria of the eventual recovery.

The report is organized into two key sections:

  • Things To Do in the Future - This section will provide a checklist of key ratios to monitor that will ensure the firm faces the most minimal financial turbulence possible under any economic conditions.
  • Things Not To Do Now - This will provide a cautionary road map to actions that should be avoided at present.

Tips for developing an employee handbook or policy manual

Tips for developing an employee handbook or policy manual

Mike Parsons
Hupp Electric Motors Co.

Hopefully your business is growing. You’re making more sales, acquiring new customers and purchasing more equipment. Now you just need more time, right? 

Regardless of the size of your business or the number of employees, you should consider creating an employee handbook or policy manual. While often overlooked, this publication could be one of the most important documents a business owner produces.

The employee handbook conveys your expectations as an employer and provides employees with a clear vision of what they can expect from the company, making this an indispensable communication tool.

Training Film 13: Assembly of a Single-Phase Capacitor Motor

Training Film 13: Assembly of a Single-Phase Capacitor Motor

Step-by-step assembly of a capacitor motor, including installation of both ball and sleeve bearings. Shows tools needed and how to align parts marked during disassembly.

This training film is archived here solely for historical purposes. The film was produced many years ago and does not meet EASA's current presentation standards. Some procedures may have also changed.

Training Film 7, Part 1: Manufacturing Form Coils (Loop Winding and Coil Forming)

Training Film 7, Part 1: Manufacturing Form Coils (Loop Winding and Coil Forming)

Shows how to determine loop dimensions, winding the loop, insulating it and spreading the coils, along with determining the dimensions of the spread coil.

This training film is archived here solely for historical purposes. The film was produced many years ago and does not meet EASA's current presentation standards. Some procedures may have also changed.

Training Film 7, Part 2: Manufacturing Form Coils (Insulating Form Coils)

Training Film 7, Part 2: Manufacturing Form Coils (Insulating Form Coils)

Teaches how to determine type of connection, number of parallel circuits, turns per coil, wire size, span and groups. Shows step-by-step way to properly record all information.

This training film is archived here solely for historical purposes. The film was produced many years ago and does not meet EASA's current presentation standards. Some procedures may have also changed.

Training Film 9: Taking Data From a Single-Phase Motor

Training Film 9: Taking Data From a Single-Phase Motor

Shows step-by-step procedure for properly determining and recording the type of connection, number of parallel circuits, turns per coil, wire size, span and groups, and how to distinguish between running and starting windings.

This training film is archived here solely for historical purposes. The film was produced many years ago and does not meet EASA's current presentation standards. Some procedures may have also changed.

U.S. Department of Labor changes overtime exemption

U.S. Department of Labor changes overtime exemption

Mike Huber
American MTS

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) recently passed new regulations as part of the Fair Labor Standards Act regarding overtime exemption for salaried employees. These new rules are causing concerns as they contain large increases in the minimum salary requirements along with a mechanism for automatically raising these figures. Some positions that may be most impacted at EASA facilities include office personnel, shop foremen, salesmen, drivers and even company owners.

U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Updates

U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Updates

Tom Barnes
Compliance Specialists, Inc.
McCalla, Alabama

While there have not been many changes to the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements over the past year, it is important to review some of the recent changes and remind you of some upcoming compliance obligations.

Una nueva norma IEEE proporciona directrices para la protección de motores en aplicaciones industriales y comerciales

Una nueva norma IEEE proporciona directrices para la protección de motores en aplicaciones industriales y comerciales

Jim Bryan
Especialista de Soporte Técnico de EASA (retirado)

El Instituto de Ingenieros Eléctricos y Electrónicos (IEEE) ha publicado una nueva norma, la IEEE 3004.8-2016: “Práctica Recomendada para la Protección de Motores en Sistemas de Potencia Industriales y Comerciales”. Los “libros de colores” están en proceso de revisión y actualización y sus designaciones cambiaron. Cada uno de los trece libros de la serie de normas de los “Libros de Colores IEEE” trata un aspecto diferente sobre la producción, distribución y uso de la energía eléctrica en sistemas de potencia industriales y comerciales; la 3004.8 reemplaza el Capítulo 10 del “Buff” book, IEEE 242-2001.  

En este proceso la labor comenzó en septiembre del 2012 con la creación de un grupo de trabajo y terminó en diciembre 6 del 2016 con la aprobación final por parte de la IEEE. El grupo de trabajo estaba formado por la presidenta Lorraine K. Padden de Houston y otros 14 ingenieros de todo el mundo. Docenas de personas más estuvieron involucradas suministrando información y votando para aprobar la versión final. EASA estuvo representada en el grupo de trabajo y su personal de soporte técnico proporcionó aportes sustanciales, incluyendo una nueva sección sobre protección de motores de C.C. El documento se puso a la venta en mayo del 2017 en la página web www.ieee.org.  El documento resultante de este minucioso proceso proporcionará directrices para la protección de mo-tores en aplicaciones industriales y comerciales. Como centros de servi-cio, cuanto más entendamos sobre el uso y la protección de motores en sus aplicaciones, mejor será el servicio que podremos ofrecer a nuestros clientes. La norma IEEE 3004.8 cubre un amplio espectro de esquemas de pro-tección de motores, incluyendo baja y media tensión C.A., factores a consid-erar, tipos de protección, aplicaciones con accionamientos de velocidad vari-able (ASD), protección de motores de C.C. y ubicaciones peligrosas.

Understanding Customers' Plant Maintenance Practices

Understanding Customers' Plant Maintenance Practices

Chris Culver
Marketing & Industry Awareness Committee Member
Cyntek Group, Inc.

When I started in this industry, I worked at my father's small motor repair shop in a small town north of Toronto. To Gain the Advantage over larger motor shops in the city, we provided exceptional customer service, delivered high-quality repairs and recognized early on that plant maintenance practices were very much reactive. So, we developed a service to offer our clients. 
In its infancy, our services included on-site surge testing during plant shutdowns and off-site motor management in our warehouse. Fast forward to today, and the type of plant maintenance options available to end-users are vast, ever-evolving and more user-friendly.

Understanding Customers' Repair vs. Replace Decisions

Understanding Customers' Repair vs. Replace Decisions

Kyle Fritz
Industry Awareness Committee Member
Northwest Electric LLC

EASA does a phenomenal job of providing members technical support, networking opportunities, technical resources, education and many other benefits. As members, we are keenly aware of these services and how to leverage them to our advantage.

EASA provides us an additional competitive edge through its market/industry research regarding the vendors, customers and service centers. These insights can help us strategize our business roadmaps. At the EASA 2019 Convention, attendees heard the results of research conducted on end-users. The presentation in its entirety, as well as the handouts, are available at easa.com.

Understanding motor temperature rise limits

Understanding motor temperature rise limits

Tom Bishop, P.E. 
EASA Technical Support Specialist 

How do we know if a motor is operating within its temperature rating? The simple answer, and a good one, is that the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has defined temperature rise for electric motors in Motors and Generators, NEMA standard MG 1-1998. In this article we will focus on temperature rise and tem­perature sensing of three-phase induction motors. 

We will begin by identifying some key terms. Temperature rise is the increase in temperature above ambient. Ambient temperature is the tempera­ture of the air (or other cooling medium) in the area surrounding the motor, frequently termed “room temperature.” The sum of the ambient temperature and the temperature rise is the overall, or “hot,” tem­perature of a component. Insulation temperature classes are based on the overall temperature. For ex­ample, a Class B winding system is rated 130ºC. The normal maximum ambient, per NEMA, is 40ºC. The temperature rise limit for the Class B winding would be estimated at 90ºC (130-40). 

Understanding the new drivers of profitability

Understanding the new drivers of profitability

Management Solutions

Dr. Al Bates, President
The Profit Planning Group

The economic upheaval of the last couple of years has caused many firms to make significant changes in their operation. To a large extent, those changes caused the typical firm to end up "leaner and meaner" than it was before. It is now time to ensure that those changes also lead to improved profit performance.

The 2012 EASA Operating Performance Report (of 2011 data) suggests that at least some firms are well on their way to outstanding long-term profit performance. The key to understanding the economics of profitability is to distinguish between the performance of the typical firm and the high-profit firm. The difference is significant and appears to be widening. (The following is based on 103 participants in the EASA 2012 Operating Performance Survey.)

Use benchmarking information to compare, set goals for profitability

Use benchmarking information to compare, set goals for profitability

Steve Rossiter
C.W. Silver Industrial Services
Salt Lake City, Utah
Management Services Committee Member

I recently read an article titled “Learning from Google” in a local busi­ness magazine. The article focused on Google’s business model of developing incredibly valuable Web services and software and then giving them away free to the public. 

Phenomenal advertising revenue is generated (commission free) through companies bidding for keywords. These companies write their own text ads that are seen by a targeted audience through Google’s massive Web pres­ence. The article noted that with this business model being so successful, some believe that Google will surpass Microsoft in size in only a matter of a few years.

So, you might ask, how is this information related to the electrical apparatus sales and service industry? Actually, it’s an example of benchmark­ing. And benchmarking can be a valu­able management tool for our industry.

Using industry research data to support organization's sales staff

Using industry research data to support organization's sales staff

Justin Hatfield
HECO, Inc.

Do your salespeople ever wish they knew more about their competitors? Do they ever wish they understood our industry better? Today, the best salespeople are ones who keep abreast of a variety of changes going on in the marketplace. At HECO, our salespeople always do their best to try and stay up to date. From emerging technologies, to how to land more clients, to what industries typical EASAns are doing business with are on their radars. This is all valuable information that your salespeople could benefit from, too.

Usual & Unusual Service Conditions for Motors and Generators

Usual & Unusual Service Conditions for Motors and Generators

Tom Bishop. P.E.
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

What are the normal conditions for which a motor is designed? This is a question that does not often come up except when there is an issue with a motor application.   

The NEMA MG1 motor and generator standards provide details on this subject by defining usual and unusual service conditions. The IEC 60034-1 standard, “Rotating Electrical Machines, Part 1 Ratings and Performance,” also addresses some application conditions in clause 6, though not to the extent given in MG1. Our focus here will be on MG1 since it provides greater detail than IEC 60034-1.

Vertical Motor Operation and Repair

Vertical Motor Operation and Repair

Chuck Yung
EASA Senior Technical Support Specialist

Vertical motors differ from horizontal motors in numerous ways, yet some view them as “just a horizontal motor turned on end.” The obvious differences are the (usually) thrust bearings, with arrangements varying from single- to three-thrust bearings with different orientations suited for specific load, rpm and applications.

Less obvious differences are in the ventilation arrangements, shaft stiffness, degrees of protection and runout tolerances. This session will include:

  • Bearing systems: Single, double or more?, Thrust direction, Angle of contact and rpm, Spherical thrust bearings, hydrodynamic
  • Ventilation and cooling
  • Operating environment, and enclosures: Enclosures (degrees of protection), ODP, TEFC, WPI, WPII (IP equivalents)
  • Oil types and quantity: Bearing load and operating temperature, Consideration of speed, Sizing and adding cooling tubes
  • Runout tolerances and repair methods: Upper bearing housing, Bearing carrier and shaft, Bottom bracket flange, Best practice methods for re-machining

This recording will benefit the service center owner, supervisor, technicians, sales personnel and customer.

Vibration and Alignment

Vibration and Alignment

9
presentations
$45
for EASA members

 

A special discounted collection of 9 webinar recordings focusing on a wide variety of vibration, balancing and alignment topics.

Once purchased, all 9 recordings will be available on your "Downloadable products purchased" page in your online account.

Downloadable recordings in this bundle include:

An Overview of Vibration Tolerances
Presented August 2019

When it comes to machine vibration, “how much is too much” depends on a number of factors. Knowing which standard and/or tolerance applies requires a working knowledge of the standards and some basics of vibration terminology. This  presentation provides an overview of where and how NEMA, IEC, ISO and Hydraulic Institute standards may apply to machines commonly encountered in EASA service centers.

  • NEMA, IEC, ISO and Hydraulic Institute standards
  • Basic vibration terminology
  • What standard applies?

Target audience: Service center managers, engineers, in-shop and field service technicians can benefit from a clearer understanding of vibration standards and terminology.


Basics of Machinery Foundations and Bases
Presented November 2012

A faulty machine foundation or base can lead to excessive vibration and premature failure. This presentation explains the fundamentals of machinery foundation construction and how to identify and troubleshoot machine base problems, including basic vibration techniques and ODS analysis.


Fundamentals of Shaft Alignment
Presented November 2012

Automatic alignment instruments are no substitute for the underlying process of aligning direct-coupled machines. This presentation explains the simple calculations that govern the alignment process. That understanding will allow technicians to use any alignment tool more effectively and deal with issues that confound the process.


Shaft Alignment
Presented March 2016

This webinar recording provies a straightforward look at the simple relationship between shaft centerlines that is known as shaft alignment. Bypassing the common discussion of laser and manual instruments, this presentation gets to the heart of the shaft alignment process. Topics covered will include:

  • Fundamental concepts
  • How to visualize machine case position
  • Practical solutions for moving machine cases
  • Applying tolerances
  • The foot-base-foundation connection

ANSI's New Shaft Alignment Standard
Presented July 2018

This presentation introduces you to ANSI's new shaft alignment standard. Topics covered include:

  • A discussion of alignment Quality grades, AL 1.2, AL 2.2, AL 4.5
  • Shaft alignment tolerances
  • Issues affecting measurements
  • Conditions affecting alignment stability

Target audience: This presentation benefits service center technicians and supervisors looking to improve shaft alignment knowledge and skills. 


How to Balance Overhung Fans
Presented October 2011

Often an overhung fan is balanced in a single plane, only to find that the vibration has shifted to the outboard bearing. Attempts to use standard two-plane techniques may result in calculated correction weights that are very large and produce poor results. There are more effective ways to approach this common problem. This presentation shows a methodical approach and techniques for tackling this difficult balancing problem.

Target audience: This presentation is intended for field service balancing technicians, supervisors and managers.


Vibration on Belt Driven Machines
Presented June 2013

This presentation focuses on:

  • Identifying belt vibration
  • Identifying pulley pitch line run-out vibration
  • Other vibration sources
  • ODS analysis

The FFT (aka Spectrum): What It Is and Ways to Use It
Presented July 2012

This presentation examines:

  • How the spectrum is generated from the vibration signal
  • The effect of f-max ad resolution settings
  • Averaging techniques
  • Scaling and demodulation

Vibration Problems on Vertical Motors and Pumps
Presented December 2010

When motors are installed on top of vertical pumps, high vibration is a common problem. The problem may be mechanical, hydraulic or structural.

This presentation provides an understanding of the nature of this style pump and the various forces essential to diagnosing and correcting vibration problems on vertical pump motors.

Voltage and horsepower

Voltage and horsepower

Follow formula to run motor on less-than-nameplate voltage

Chuck Yung 
EASA Technical Support Specialist 

You may have experienced this situation before: Your best customer just called to say he has a plant down and is in desperate need of a 100 HP, 6-pole, 460-volt motor.  And he needs it now! 

You check your stock and find one that's pretty close. The frame is right, but it's a 125 HP unit at 575 volts. What can you do? You know that the motor will run at 460 volts, but how much horsepower will it produce? 

Voltage stress: Not as simple as it sounds

Voltage stress: Not as simple as it sounds

Chuck Yung
EASA Technical Support Specialist

Have you ever wondered how a lightning rod works? That small rod atop a large building extends less than a yard (meter) above the building. Yet the lightning is attracted to that sacri­ficial rod rather than to the building. If you have not wondered about lightning rods, I'll bet you are curious about what lightning rods could possibly have to do with electric motors. 

The common denominator between electrical windings and lightning rods is geometry. Lightning strikes the light­ning rod because the voltage stresses are higher between the pointed rod and the cloud than between that same cloud and the building. The pointed shape raises the potential voltage stress at the end of the lightning rod. For the same reason, we often see winding failures affected by the geometry of a coil, a connection, or a sharp corner within a stator frame. 

When the subject of voltage stress comes up, many people assume that the voltage stress does not exceed the line voltage of the winding. Our early as­sumptions were that voltage stresses followed a linear pattern and could simply be calculated by the relation­ship of circuits, coils and turns per coil. 

What does it mean when a rewound motor runs "hot"? Items to check to make sure it's operating properly

What does it mean when a rewound motor runs "hot"? Items to check to make sure it's operating properly

“We have rewound a motor, and now that it is back in service, our cus­tomer says it’s running hot. The frame is getting so hot that he can’t put his hand on it, and now he is blaming us for rewinding the motor incorrectly!” 

Has this ever happened to you? You have rewound a motor without changing the design at all; you tested the motor before you sent it out, and everything appeared to be fine. But now your customer wants you to fig­ure out what is wrong, or rewind the motor again. 

Before you consider this, there are a few things to check to see if the motor is, in fact, running properly. It is quite possible that the motor ran “hot” before it failed, but what are the chances that someone on-site put their hand to the frame before it had to be rewound? 

What Kind of Leader Are You?

What Kind of Leader Are You?

Exploring Management Styles

Ron Collins
Management Services Committee Member
Tennessee Associated Electric
Knoxville, TN

Leaders have their unique management styles, but not all employees will respond the same way to the same style. Understanding different styles helps us as leaders manage our workforce better. What’s your style? You are likely to already using several different styles.

What watts, what pounds? Working with stator core test results

What watts, what pounds? Working with stator core test results

Mike Howell
EASA Technical Support Specialist

The two primary reasons for performing stator core testing in the service center are (1) to verify that the stator core is acceptable for continued use and in the event of a rewind, and (2) to verify that the repair process has not adversely changed the stator core condition.

The purpose of this article is to discuss how we determine, assess and compare stator core test results. It is extremely important to understand that variance in test procedures may invalidate comparison.

When looking for the most qualified service center trainees, don't forget about trade schools

When looking for the most qualified service center trainees, don't forget about trade schools

H. Roger Kauffman
Electric Motor Repair Co.
Baltimore, Maryland 
Management Services Committee Member

If the trend over the last 10 years continues, where will skilled labor come from in the future? This current dilemma and the worsening prospects will force many companies in the elec­trical, electronic and/or mechanical apparatus service and repair industry to rethink traditional recruitment and hiring methods. 

It will force them to create new and previously untested methods to attract, hire, train and retain skilled workers. 

For decent paying jobs, students must choose between college and a trade school. Neither provides training where the graduate can walk into one of our service centers and hit the ground running.  

When the going gets tough, the tough still produce a profit

When the going gets tough, the tough still produce a profit

Dr. Al Bates, President
The Profit Planning Group 

For most firms, 2008 qualifies as a year to file and forget. The financial results for recession years, however, offer some extremely valuable insights into what distinguishes the outstanding firm from the more typical firm. An analysis of the results for 2008, therefore, can be very insightful.

The recently completed 2009 EASA Operating Performance Report (of 2008 data) provides detailed financial and operating benchmarks for the industry. It indicates that many firms struggled to some extent. Some firms, however, continued to prosper despite sales and margin pressures. The differences between the typical firm and the high-profit firm are significant. (The following is based on 139 participants in the EASA 2009 Operating Performance Survey.)

Why Pumps Fail

Why Pumps Fail

Gene Vogel
EASA Pump & Vibration Specialist

Centrifugal pump failures are most commonly attributed to seal failure, impeller damage and bearing failures. A good understanding of failure modes for seals, impellers and bearings is essential to providing customers with reliable pump repairs. This presentation will explore various failure modes and provide some direction on ways to avoid them.  

  • How mechanical pump seals operate, the importance of seal face material selection and proper installation techniques 
  • Impeller damage examples and causes 
  • General rolling element bearing failure modes 
  • Bearing failure modes unique to vertical turbine pumps and associated vertical motors 

This recording will be useful for service center engineers, pump technicians and operations managers.

Working with AC Windings

Working with AC Windings

12
presentations
$60
for EASA members

 

A special discounted collection of 12 webinar recordings focusing on AC motor windings.

Once purchased, all 12 recordings will be available on your "Downloadable products purchased" page in your online account.

Downloadable recordings in this bundle include:

The Basics: Taking Motor Data
Presented September 2016

This presentation covers:

  • Photo documentation
  • Paper documentation
  • Measurements
  • Winding data: turns, wire size, connection, core dimensions
  • Keeping cause of failure questions in mind

Taking Three-Phase Winding Data
Presented October 2012

This presentation stresses the importance of taking accurate winding data and explains and emphasizes the consequences of inaccurate data. Details are provided on how to take accurate electrical and mechanical data as well as how to verify the data is correct. It gives you and improved ability to "get it right the first time" so as to avoid the added cost and time of another rewind to correct errors.


The Basics: Motor Connections
Presented November 2016

This webinar covers:

  • Internal connections
  • Connections in the outlet box
  • Connections in the MCC Ladder diagrams

Tips and Techniques for Winders
Presented August 2015

This webinar covers:

  • Procedural tips for coil insertion
  • Creating slot room where there is none
  • Faster, easier separators
  • Lacing technique to prevent phase paper pull-out
  • Interspersed coil winding made simple
  • Better braze joints

Rewinding Tips for Premium Efficient Motors
Presented June 2016

This webinar recording covers: 

  • Importance of core loss testing
  • Methods to reduce core losses
  • Slot fill improvement without reducing copper

Windings & Connections
Presented December 2015

This webinar recording focuses on the internal connections of AC motors, including:

  • Wye or delta?
  • Parallel circuits
  • Dual voltage - delta connected, wye connected and wye/delta connected
  • Tri-voltage - 2D2Y1D and others

Concentric or Lap? Considerations for the 2-Pole Stator Rewind
Presented September 2014

Two-pole motors present special rewind issues, especially when converting them from concentric to lap windings. The pitch is especially important as certain coil pitches will cause harmonics that have a negative impact on performance. Optimum pitches are often very difficult to wind and shorter pitches result in sacrificed conductor area.

This presentation explores sample redesigns and present some guidelines to assist in deciding between the concentric and lap winding.

Target audience: This webinar will be most useful for service center winders, engineers, supervisors and managers. The content will be beneficial for beginners through highly experienced persons.


Stator Rewinds: When Things Get Tight
Presented June 2015

When preparing to rewind random or form wound stators, sometimes there just doesn’t seem to be enough room in the stator slot for the desired conductor area and insulation quantities. Common scenarios encountered are redesigns from concentric to lap, changes to higher voltages or aggressive designs from the OEM.

This webinar will look at balancing stator copper losses against insulation reliability.


Ensuring Success With VPI
Presented June 2014

Global vacuum pressure impregnation is the most common insulation system processing method utilized for form wound stators today. A successful VPI depends on several variables including materials, methods and maintenance. This recording will provide information to assist the service center with ensuring success with form wound VPI projects.

Target audience: This recording will be most useful for service center winders, engineers, supervisors and managers. The content will be beneficial for beginners through highly-experienced persons.


Induction Motor Rotor Windings: Squirrel-Cage and Wonld Rotor Basics
Presented January 2018

This presentation covers the following topics:

  • Induction motor basics for operation
  • Squirrel-cage
    • Conductor material
    • Deep-bar effect
    • Multiple-cage windings
    • Phase resistance
    • IEC/NEMA design letters
    • Speed-torque characteristics
  • Wound-rotor
    • Winding construction
    • Wave-wound connections
    • Distribution factor and chord factor
    • Rotor phase voltage
    • Speed-torque characteristics

Target audience: This webinar will benefit service center technicians and supervisors. 


2-Speed, 2-Winding Pole Group Connections
Presented September 2018

The topics covered included in this webinar recording:

  • One circuit wye connection — Best, no parallel paths, turns per coil may prevent this
  • Delta or multiple parallel circuits—Produces closed circuits, Circulating currents
  • Open delta (4 wire connection)
  • Permissible connections—Skip pole, adjacent pole
  • Determined by speed combination

T​arget audience: This webinar recording will benefit service center technicians and supervisors.


Minimizing Risk With High-Voltage Rewinds
Presented February 2014

This webinar presents a product quality planning process for industrial motor stator windings rated above 4 kV. Emphasis is placed on analyzing gaps between these projects and lower voltage rewinds as they relate to:

  • Stator winding design
  • Insulation system validation
  • Process control

Target audience: This presentation is most useful for service center winders, engineers, supervisors and managers. The content targets beginners through highly experienced persons.

Working with the No Nameplate Motor

Working with the No Nameplate Motor

Nidec Motor Corp. webinar sponsorship badgeCustomers often send in a motor with no nameplate and having little knowledge of the machine’s ratings. This presentation guides the attendees through the process of evaluating the machine using core size, winding data and diagnostic testing to assign reasonable ratings.

This presentation is useful for service center technicians, supervisors and managers.

Your Customers Need a Trusted Advisor. Will It Be You?

Your Customers Need a Trusted Advisor. Will It Be You?

Kelley Fujino
Marketing + Industry Awareness Committee Member
Lubbock Electric Co.
Lubbock, Texas

Throughout the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, most EASA service centers were able to continue operating as “essential businesses.” However, it has not been business as usual. You might have noticed at the height of shutdowns that the phone stopped ringing. Perhaps some of your customers shut down plants, and others began to defer capital spending to free up cash. Maybe business has begun to pick back up again, but it might not be at the level you projected for the year. What’s worse, “business as usual” may not return for some time, if ever. Now is the time to explore new opportunities and adapt.