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Articles in Industry Publications

Motor maintenance trends: 6 factors to evaluate

Recent EASA research studies provide new insights on repair vs. replace to help motors reliably drive machinery, pumps, conveyors, and other vital industrial equipment

  • June 2018
  • Number of views: 8671
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

When faced with an ailing or failed motor, plant operators typically consider whether to repair or replace it. According to a 2014 study conducted by Plant Engineering magazine for the Electrical Apparatus and Service Association (EASA), just more than one-half of plants have a policy of automatically replacing failed electric motors below a certain horsepower rating. While that horsepower rating varied depending upon the plant’s installed motor population, the average rating was 30 hp.

While such policies address a portion of the motors used at most plants, they do not cover what occurs with those motors. That question was addressed in a more recent research project commissioned by EASA that focused on the disposition of electric motors considered for repair.

How to ensure effective motor repair and rewind

Speak the same language as your service center when it comes to setting performance expectations

  • May 2016
  • Number of views: 8194
Trade press article — Plant Services

Electric motor efficiency can be maintained during repair and rewind by following defined good practices. This article builds on a previous discussion of PM and PdM for three-phase squirrel-cage motors ("PM and PdM for electric motors") by outlining some of the expectations and good practices for repairs of these types of motors.

Mechanical repairs play a key role in motor repair and reliability

EASA AR100 details steps to take to clean, repair, and test equipment

  • November 2015
  • Number of views: 7677
Trade press article — Plant Engineering

In a previous article in Plant Engineering ("A systematic approach to AC motor repair," Plant Engineering, April 2015), EASA highlighted the good practices for electrical repair found in ANSI/EASA Standard AR100 Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus, and the significant impact they can have on motor efficiency and reliability. But that was only part of the story, because mechanical repairs—and even documentation, cleaning, and inspection—can also markedly affect motor reliability and efficiency.