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Articles in Industry Publications

Auxiliary cooling of electric motors (and other equipment)

  • January 2017
  • Number of views: 9923
Article

Although the earliest practical DC motor was built by Moritz Jacobi in 1834, it was over the next 40 years that men like Thomas Davenport, Emil Stohrer and George Westinghouse brought DC machines into industrial use.  It’s inspiring to realize that work-ing DC motors have been around for over 160 years. For the past century, DC machines over 30 or 40 kW have been cooled in the same manner – by mounting a squirrel cage blower directly over the commutator.

Refrigeración auxiliar de motores eléctricos (y otros equipos)

  • January 2017
  • Number of views: 9174
Article

Cool facts about cooling electric motors

Improvements in applications that fall outside the normal operating conditions

  • November 2015
  • Number of views: 11371
Trade press article — IEEE Industry Applications

The evolution of electric motor design as it pertains to cooling methods provides insights about better ways to cool machines in service. The array of methods engineers have devised to solve the same problems are fascinating yet reassuring because many things remain unchanged even after a century of progress. This article discusses how motors are cooled and how heat dissipation can be improved for applications that fall outside the normal operating conditions defined by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Standard MG 1.

Cool advice on hot motors

  • August 2015
  • Number of views: 11462
Trade press article — Maintenance Technology

The effects of excessive temperature on motor performance are notorious. After moisture, they are the greatest contributor to bearing and winding failures. Understanding the source of increased temperature is key to correcting the problem and improving the reliability of your facility’s motor fleet.

How to Balance Overhung Fans

  • October 2011
  • Number of views: 9925
Webinar recording

This presentation shows a methodical approach and techniques for tackling this difficult balancing problem.

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Cool facts about cooling electric motors

Whether old or new design, lowering temperatures based on same principles

  • July 2011
  • Number of views: 7385
Article

Whether an old or new design, lowering temperatures is based on the same principles. I've often commented on how fortunate we are to work on such a variety of electric motor designs. One day, you are working on a new design some designer has recently created, and the next day you are repairing a motor that could be in a museum. It's fascinating to see the different ways engineers have devised to do the same thing, and yet reassuring to see how many things remain unchanged even after a century of electric motors. One aspect of electric motors that could be placed in both categories is the way an electric motor is cooled. This article takes a look at how motors are cooled and how we can improve cooling for some of the special applications we encounter.

Fan law knowledge can help performance

  • October 2002
  • Number of views: 13809
Article

Most of us involved in the repair of electrical equipment have a good understanding of how an electric motor works — especially the stator and rotor. But the fan can appear deceptively simple. Fans are pretty interesting, once we learn a few "affinity laws" — rules that also apply to blowers and impellers. This article will review some basic facts about fans that explain how small changes to a fan can make a BIG difference.