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Articles in Industry Publications

EASA Technical Manual

  • September 2022
  • Number of views: 27473
FREE for Members of EASA
Book

Revised September 2022!
EASA's most comprehensive technical document is available FREE to EASA members. Download the complete manual or just the sections you're interested in.

Vertical Motor Operation and Repair

  • June 2020
  • Number of views: 17140
FREE for Members of EASA
Convention presentation

Vertical motors differ from horizontal motors in numerous ways, yet some view them as “just a horizontal motor turned on end.” The obvious differences are the (usually) thrust bearings, with arrangements varying from single- to three-thrust bearings with different orientations suited for specific load, rpm and applications. Less obvious differences are in the ventilation arrangements, shaft stiffness, degrees of protection and runout tolerances. This recording will cover those topics.

Increasing Motor Reliability

Regularly Checking the Operating Temperature of Critical Motors Will Help Extend Their Life and Prevent Costly, Unexpected Shutdowns

  • February 2020
  • Number of views: 12496
Trade press article — Electrical Business

Regardless of the method used to detect winding temperature, the total, or hot spot, temperature is the real limit; and the lower it is, the better. Don’t let excessive heat kill your motors before their time.

Motor Temperature Rise and Methods to Increase Winding Life

  • December 2018
  • Number of views: 8591
Webinar recording

This webinar recording discusses:

  • Temperature rise (Method of detection, Insulation class, Enclosure, Service Factor)
  • Increasing winding life (Insulation class, Cooling system, Winding redesign)
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How To Wind Three-Phase Stators (Version 2)

Self-paced, interactive training for stators 600 volts or less

  • February 2017
  • Number of views: 15384
Software

This EASA software is a valuable interactive training tool ideal for training your novice(s) ... and even experienced winders will learn from it. The CD teaches how to wind in a richly detailed, step-by-step approach which includes narrative, animations and video clips, with tests to assess student comprehension. 

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Auxiliary cooling of electric motors (and other equipment)

  • January 2017
  • Number of views: 9923
Article

Although the earliest practical DC motor was built by Moritz Jacobi in 1834, it was over the next 40 years that men like Thomas Davenport, Emil Stohrer and George Westinghouse brought DC machines into industrial use.  It’s inspiring to realize that work-ing DC motors have been around for over 160 years. For the past century, DC machines over 30 or 40 kW have been cooled in the same manner – by mounting a squirrel cage blower directly over the commutator.

Refrigeración auxiliar de motores eléctricos (y otros equipos)

  • January 2017
  • Number of views: 9174
Article

Cool facts about cooling electric motors

Improvements in applications that fall outside the normal operating conditions

  • November 2015
  • Number of views: 11371
Trade press article — IEEE Industry Applications

The evolution of electric motor design as it pertains to cooling methods provides insights about better ways to cool machines in service. The array of methods engineers have devised to solve the same problems are fascinating yet reassuring because many things remain unchanged even after a century of progress. This article discusses how motors are cooled and how heat dissipation can be improved for applications that fall outside the normal operating conditions defined by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Standard MG 1.

Cool advice on hot motors

  • August 2015
  • Number of views: 11461
Trade press article — Maintenance Technology

The effects of excessive temperature on motor performance are notorious. After moisture, they are the greatest contributor to bearing and winding failures. Understanding the source of increased temperature is key to correcting the problem and improving the reliability of your facility’s motor fleet.

Keeping it cool: A look at causes of motor overheating

  • March 2015
  • Number of views: 14357
Article

We know that excessive temperature and moisture are the largest contributors to bearing and winding failures. Understanding the source of the increased temperature will help us to correct the problem and improve the machine’s life expectancy.

Cool facts about cooling electric motors

Whether old or new design, lowering temperatures based on same principles

  • July 2011
  • Number of views: 7385
Article

Whether an old or new design, lowering temperatures is based on the same principles. I've often commented on how fortunate we are to work on such a variety of electric motor designs. One day, you are working on a new design some designer has recently created, and the next day you are repairing a motor that could be in a museum. It's fascinating to see the different ways engineers have devised to do the same thing, and yet reassuring to see how many things remain unchanged even after a century of electric motors. One aspect of electric motors that could be placed in both categories is the way an electric motor is cooled. This article takes a look at how motors are cooled and how we can improve cooling for some of the special applications we encounter.

Cuando se trata de motores ¿Qué tan caliente es caliente?

Las temperaturas muy altas afectan la vida útil del motor

  • June 2011
  • Number of views: 4443
Article

Frecuentemente escuchamos decir a nuestros miembros, que uno de sus clientes le ha informado que un motor que había sido reparado, ahora se calienta. Nosotros siempre les preguntamos ¿Qué tan caliente? y por lo general responden “Bueno, no puedo mantener mi mano sobre él”.

Vamos a pensar un minuto en esta respuesta. La mano del ser humano típico, puede soportar una temperatura entre 60-65°C (140-150°F), dependi-endo de las callosidades, el dolor que pueda tolerar, cuantas personas estén observando, etc. ... la temperatura es el enemigo número 1 de los motores eléctricos. Para optimizar la vida útil y el buen funcionamiento de los motores, se debe tener cuidado con el diseño, la aplicación y el mantenimiento de estas máquinas. Teniendo en cuenta todo lo anterior, no se considera seguro tocar con la mano la superfcie de un motor para saber si está muy caliente. En vez de esto, lo mejor es utilizar un termómetro.